Home » News » Parenting » Division of Labor, Husband’s Employment, Influence Divorce Risk
Division of Labor, Husband’s Employment, Influence Divorce Risk

Division of Labor, Husband’s Employment, Influence Divorce Risk

A new study provides surprising results in that financial factors, including wives’ ability to support themselves in the event of a divorce, do not influence the risk of divorce.

Factors that influence divorce include how the couple divides work tasks. The division of labor — paid and unpaid — appears to influence whether a divorce occurs instead of financial factors.

“My results suggest that, in general, financial factors do not determine whether couples stay together or separate,” said study author Alexandra Killewald, a professor of sociology at Harvard University.

“Instead, couples’ paid and unpaid work matters for the risk of divorce, even after adjusting for how work is related to financial resources.”

Titled, “Money, Work, and Marital Stability: Assessing Change in the Gendered Determinants of Divorce,” the study uses nationally representative data on more than 6,300 different-sex couples, both spouses age 18 to 55.

Researchers examined what effect, if any, couples’ division of labor, their overall financial resources, and wives’ economic prospects following divorce — have on marital stability.

In the study, which appears in the American Sociological Review, Killewald compared couples married in 1974 or earlier with couples married in 1975 or later to explore whether the effects, or lack thereof, of these factors changed over time.

Killewald found that, in both the old and new cohorts, financial factors did not play a role in divorce. On the other hand, while the division of labor did affect marital outcomes in both cohorts, there was some variation in terms of what division of labor was better for marriage stability.

For couples married before 1975, the higher the percentage of housework a woman did, the less likely her marriage was to end in divorce.

Researchers found that duration of a marriage does make a difference as for people married after 1975, the amount of housework a women does, did not make a difference.

“For couples married more recently, expectations for the division of housework between spouses appear to have changed, so that men are expected to contribute at least somewhat to household labor,” said Killewald.

Killewald discovered that, even in the more recent marriage cohort, wives do more than 70 percent of the housework, on average.

“In general, men seem to be contributing a little more than they used to, and these contributions may now be expected and appreciated by wives.”

Killewald found that, for couples married after 1974, neither wives’ full-time employment nor sharing the housework more evenly was associated with the risk of divorce.

In this cohort, husbands’ full-time employment was an important factor in marital stability, with the risk of divorce higher for men who were not employed full-time.

“For contemporary couples, wives can combine paid and unpaid labor in various ways without threatening the stability of their marriage,” according to Killewald.

Killwald discovered that while the gender revolution and the feminist movement have allowed women to take on traditionally male-dominated roles and responsibilities, men’s roles and responsibilities have not expanded or diversified proportionately.

“While contemporary wives need not embrace the traditional female homemaker role to stay married, contemporary husbands face higher risk of divorce when they do not fulfill the stereotypical breadwinner role, by being employed full-time,” Killewald said.

Regarding financial factors, by finding that couples’ overall resources and wives’ economic prospects following divorce did not determine whether marriages lasted.

The study dispels the theory that attributes the spike in divorce rates to women’s increased financial independence.

“The fact that divorce rates rose during the second half of the 20th century at the same time when women were moving into the labor force has prompted some speculation that marital stability has declined because women no longer ‘need’ to be married for financial security,” Killewald said.

“For some, this implies that women’s entry into the work force has come at the expense of stable marriages. My results do not suggest any tradeoff of that kind.”

Though changing gender roles have afforded women greater flexibility in terms of labor without jeopardizing their marriages, the study indicates that men have not been granted similar freedom.

“Often when scholars or the media talk about work-family policies or work-family balance, they focus mostly on the experiences of women,” Killewald said.

“Although much of the responsibility for negotiating that balance falls to women, my results suggest one way that expectations about gender and family roles and responsibilities affect men’s lives, too: men who aren’t able to sustain full-time work face heightened risk of divorce.”

In terms of the study’s policy implications, Killewald said her research may help guide policymakers who are considering the societal impact of policies that provide financial support to unmarried women.

The finding may influence public policy.

“Because I do not find that couples are more likely to divorce when women are better able to sustain themselves financially in the event of a divorce, public financial support — to divorced women and other groups — such as the earned income tax credit (EITC) or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), is unlikely to heighten divorce rates,” Killewald said.

Source: American Sociological Review/EurekAlert

Division of Labor, Husband’s Employment, Influence Divorce Risk

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Division of Labor, Husband’s Employment, Influence Divorce Risk. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 22, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/07/29/division-of-labor-husbands-employment-influence-divorce-risk/107857.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 29 Jul 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 29 Jul 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.