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Research Suggest Multiple Paths to Autism

Research Suggest Multiple Paths to Autism

A new study challenges the long-held believe that alterations in social brain networks influence the development of autism. The new research posits that brain variations in infants at risk for autism may be widespread and affect multiple systems.

Autism is diagnosed based on impairments in social and communication behaviors. These symptoms tend to emerge in the second year of life. Research over the past decade has focused on identifying autistic abnormalities in early infancy.

Experts believe improved knowledge of how autism develops could potentially allow clinicians to predict the disorder before it emerges.

Attempts to identify precursors have primarily focused on social behaviors, based on the assumption that abnormalities in social brain networks arise early in life and compound throughout development.

Now, Dr. Mayada Elsabbagh from McGill University in Canada, and Dr. Mark Johnson, from Birkbeck, University of London, believe recent studies fail to support the idea of a singular pathway in the development of autism.

As published in the journal Biological Psychiatry, Elsabbagh and Johnson reviewed studies examining infants at risk for autism. They discovered behavioral research supporting evidence for general abnormalities during the first year of life.

These include delayed motor maturation, higher level of perceptual sensitivity, and poor attention flexibility. The authors also highlight brain imaging studies that provide evidence for widespread alterations throughout brain networks, rather than focal deficits in social networks.

The behavioral and imaging studies challenge the assumption of early social network abnormalities that persist throughout development and lead to emergence of the disorder.

“Our review reveals little support for localized deficits in social brain network systems within the first year of life,” said Elsabbagh.

“It instead favors the view that atypical development involving perceptual, attentional, motor, and social systems precede emerging autism and lead to overt behavioral symptoms by the second year.”

The review suggests that focusing on a single deficit may not be sufficient to identify early warning signs and will likely adjust how researchers conceptualize the disorder.

“There has been a concerted effort to identify the final common neural pathways underlying symptoms and deficits for psychiatric disorders,” said Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.

“Yet the perspective shared by Elsabbagh and Johnson suggests that there are widespread disturbances in brain development in autism spectrum disorder and that the prominent social deficits either reflect the fact that circuits underlying social behaviors are among the many circuits affected or that some functional deficits are emergent properties of multiple affected circuits.”

Source: Elsevier

Research Suggest Multiple Paths to Autism

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Research Suggest Multiple Paths to Autism. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/07/20/research-suggest-multiple-paths-to-autism/107414.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 20 Jul 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 20 Jul 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.