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Exercise Can Boost Youth Academic Performance

Exercise Can Boost Youth Academic Performance

Using the best available evidence on the impact of physical activity on children and young people, researchers find that time taken away from lessons for physical activity is time well spent and does not come at the cost of getting good grades.

The statement on physical activity in schools and during leisure time appears online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. It was drawn up by a panel of international experts with a wide range of specialties from the UK, Scandinavia, North America, and Denmark.

The document includes 21 separate statements on the four themes of fitness and health; intellectual performance; engagement, motivation, and well-being; and social inclusion. The recommendations encompass structured and unstructured forms of physical activity for six to to 18-year-olds in school and during leisure time.

Recommendations include:

  • physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are good for children’s and young people’s brain development and function as well as their intellect;
  • a session of physical activity before, during, and after school boosts academic prowess;
  • a single session of moderately energetic physical activity has immediate positive effects on brain function, intellect, and academic performance;
  • mastery of basic movement boosts brain power and academic performance;
  • time taken away from lessons in favour of physical activity does not come at the cost of getting good grades.

In terms of the physiological benefits of exercise, the Statement says that cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness “are strong predictors” of the risk of developing heart disease and type II diabetes in later life, and that vigorous exercise in childhood helps to keep these risk factors in check.

Experts also acknowledge that frequent moderate intensity and, to a lesser extent, low intensity exercise will still help improve kids’ heart health and their metabolism. Moreover, the positive effects of exercise are not restricted to physical health, says the Statement.

Experts contend that regular physical activity can help develop important life skills, and boost self-esteem, motivation, confidence, and wellbeing. And it can strengthen/foster relationships with peers, parents, and coaches.

And just as importantly, activities that take account of culture and context can promote social inclusion for those from different backgrounds, ethnicities, sexual orientation, skill levels, and physical capacity.

Incorporating physical activity into every aspect of school life and providing protected public spaces, such as bike lanes, parks, and playgrounds “are both effective strategies for providing equitable access to, and enhancing physical activity for, children and youth,” says the Statement.

Professor Craig Williams, director of the Children’s Health and Exercise Research Centre, Sport and Health Sciences at Exeter was one of eight international speakers invited to provide expert statements to aid Danish colleagues revise their national consensus guidelines.

Williams said, “Over the 30 years we have been researching the health and well-being of young people, we have seen the accumulation of pediatric data across physiological, psychological, environmental, and social issues.

“This 21-point consensus statement reflects the importance of enhanced physical activity, not just in schools but sports and recreational clubs, with the family, and even for those children with long term illness. At all levels of society, we must ensure that enhanced physical activity is put into practice.”

Source: University of Exeter

Exercise Can Boost Youth Academic Performance

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Exercise Can Boost Youth Academic Performance. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 20, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/06/30/exercise-can-boost-youth-academic-performance/105824.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 30 Jun 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 30 Jun 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.