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Physical and Mental Work Environment Can Effect Cognitive Health

Physical and Mental Work Environment Can Effect Cognitive Health

New research suggests that both a lack of stimulation in the workplace and a dirty working environment can have a long-term cognitive effect on employees.

The findings help to clarify the cognitive effects of poor physical plant hygiene and a dull work environment.

“Psychologists say that the brain is a muscle, while industrial hygienists point to chemicals in the work environment that may cause decline,” said Joseph Grzywacz, a professor of Family and Child Sciences at Florida State university. Grzywacz is the lead researcher on the study.

“There are real things in the workplace that can shape cognitive function: some that you can see or touch, and others you can’t. We showed that both matter to cognitive health in adulthood.”

In the past, researchers had been divided on whether it was working in an unclean workplace — facing exposure to agents such as mold, lead, or loud noises — or working in an unstimulating environment that took the biggest toll on brain health as people aged.

This new study is significant because it showed both can play an important role in long-term cognitive well-being.

Grzywacz’ findings are published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Grzywacz and his team obtained cognitive function data from working adults participating in the ‘Midlife in the United States’ study.

Investigators believe the findings provide two major takeaways: One was that greater occupational complexity — that is the learning of new skills and taking on new challenges — resulted in stronger cognitive performance particularly for women as they aged.

The second result was that men and women who had jobs that exposed them to a dirty working environment saw a cognitive decline.

“Both of these issues are important when we think about the long-term health of men and women,” said Grzywacz.

Grzywacz and colleagues analyzed the data from 4,963 adults ages 32 to 84 from the 48 contiguous states. The sample was 47 percent male and 53 percent female.

The research team examined individuals’ workplaces and their ability to maintain and later use information they learned. They also looked at their executive functioning skills such as their ability to complete tasks, manage time, and pay attention.

Additionally, the data included responses from participants asking them about any memory issues they were experiencing.

“The practical issue here is cognitive decline associated with aging and the thought of, ‘if you don’t use it, you lose it,'” Grzywacz said.

“Designing jobs to ensure that all workers have some decision making ability may protect cognitive function later in life, but it’s also about cleaning up the workplace.”

Source: Florida State University

Physical and Mental Work Environment Can Effect Cognitive Health

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Physical and Mental Work Environment Can Effect Cognitive Health. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 17, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/06/17/physical-and-mental-work-environment-can-effect-cognitive-health/104930.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 17 Jun 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 17 Jun 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.