advertisement
Home » News » Mind-Reading Motivation (MRM): Observing Behavior to Understand a Person’s Perspective
bigstock

Mind-Reading Motivation (MRM): Observing Behavior to Understand a Person’s Perspective

Researchers have coined a new term for the practice of observing and interpreting bits of social information that helps to understand other people’s perspectives.

The strategy is called mind-reading motivation, an approach that has strong implications for teamwork or relationships.

For instance, observing that the person next to you is rhythmically drumming his fingers may be because he’s anxious. Likewise, you may deduce that someone is preoccupied when she is gazing off into the distance.

Mind-reading motivation (MRM) is the tendency to engage with the mental states and perspectives of others. But it’s much more than just a means of passing idle time.

Being high in MRM leads to many social benefits, including better teamwork, according to Melanie Green.

Green is an associate professor in the University at Buffalo Department of Communication and the corresponding author of the a new study published in the journal Motivation and Emotion.

“We’re not talking about the psychic phenomenon or anything like that, but simply using cues from other people’s behavior, their non-verbal signals, to try to figure out what they’re thinking,” says Green.

MRM is an entirely new construct, according to those who developed it: Green and her coauthors Jordan M. Carpenter at the University of Pennsylvania and Tanya Vacharkulksemsuk at Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. The researchers also believe this approach has implications for advertising and relationships.

Individuals high in mind-reading motivation enjoy speculating on others’ thoughts based on the potentially hundreds of social cues they might receive. Those low in MRM dislike or have no interest in doing so. MRM is about the motivation to engage with other minds, and is distinct from the ability to accurately interpret others’ cues.

“We didn’t measure ability directly in our study of teamwork, but the research suggests that just the motivation to understand others, and presumably the behaviors that go along with that motivation, appear to lead to benefits,” says Green.

In addition to facilitating cooperation and better teamwork, people high in MRM also consider people in great detail and have a nuanced understanding of those around them.

That is, the practice of ‘getting into someone’s’ head can have social benefits.

“Those high in MRM seem to develop richer psychological portraits of those around them,” says Green. “It’s the difference between saying ‘this person strives for success, but is afraid of achieving it’ as opposed to ‘this person is a great cook.'”

The relevance of those portraits also appears to have implications for advertising and the salience of certain messages.

“High MRM people are more drawn to and pay more attention to messages with an identifiable source – a spokesperson or an ad focusing on company values – that is, someone whose perspective they can try to understand.” says Green.

“On the other hand, low mind-reading motivation people seem to pay more attention to ads that are more impersonal, like those that just discuss the product – a message that does not appear to come from a particular person or group.”

Although there is no previous research in MRM, there is a long history of studies on perspective taking. But much of that research has focused on situations where perspective taking, in a sense, is required.

“Think about seeing some kind of trouble and trying to figure out what’s wrong,” she says. “Or noticing your partner is upset and you try to figure out what they’re thinking.”

Green and her colleagues thought there might be a difference in how much people enjoy or were motivated to speculate on people’s thoughts in situations where there was no situational need or institutional pressure. It could be as simple as a bus passenger considering the thoughts of those across the aisle.

“This hadn’t been previously considered from the standpoint of individual differences,” says Green. “That’s where this research is something new.”

Source: University of Buffalo

Mind-Reading Motivation (MRM): Observing Behavior to Understand a Person’s Perspective

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Mind-Reading Motivation (MRM): Observing Behavior to Understand a Person’s Perspective. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/06/02/mind-reading-motivation-mrm-observing-behavior-to-understand-a-persons-perspective/104141.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 2 Jun 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 2 Jun 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.