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New Brain Area of Interest in Depression Surprises Researchers

New Brain Area of Interest in Depression Surprises Researchers

A study using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) shows that for people with depression, the region of the brain that helps us manage expectations of bad experiences reacts in an opposite manner than what occurs in healthy adults.

The University College of London study found that activity in the habenula, a pea-sized region of the brain, functions abnormally in depressed individuals.

The finding was a follow-up to the discovery that the habenula was activated in healthy volunteers when they expected to receive an electric shock.

“A prominent theory has suggested that a hyperactive habenula drives symptoms in people with depression: we set out to test that hypothesis,” said senior author Professor Jonathan Roiser.

“Surprisingly, we saw the exact opposite of what we predicted. In people with depression, habenula activity actually decreased when they thought they would get a shock. This shows that in depressed people the habenula reacts in a fundamentally different way. Although we still don’t know how or why this happens, it’s clear that the theory needs a rethink.”

The researchers scanned the brains of 25 people with depression and 25 never-depressed individuals using fMRI.

For the study, the participants were shown a sequence of abstract pictures while they lay inside the scanner.

Over time they learned that different pictures were associated with a chance of different outcomes, either good or bad. Images predicting electric shocks were found to cause increased habenula activation in healthy volunteers, but decreased activation in depressed people.

There were no differences in average habenula size between people with depression and healthy volunteers. However, people with smaller habenulae, in both groups, were found to have more symptoms of anhedonia, a loss of interest or pleasure in life.

“The habenula’s role in depression is clearly much more complex than previously thought,” said lead author Dr. Rebecca Lawson.

“From this experimental fMRI study we can draw conclusions about the effects of anticipated shocks on habenula activation in depressed individuals compared with healthy volunteers. We can only speculate as to how this deactivation is linked to symptoms, but it could be that this ancient part of the brain actually plays a protective role against depression.

“Animal experiments have shown that stimulating the habenula leads to avoidance, and it is possible that this occurs for mental as well as physical negative events.

“So one possible explanation is that the habenula may help us to avoid dwelling on unpleasant thoughts or memories, and when this is disrupted you get the excessive negative focus that is common in depression.”

The research appears in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

Source: University College London/EurekAlert

New Brain Area of Interest in Depression Surprises Researchers

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). New Brain Area of Interest in Depression Surprises Researchers. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/06/01/new-brain-area-of-interest-in-depression-surprises-researchers/104095.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 1 Jun 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 1 Jun 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.