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Moderate Omega-3 Diet May Slow Cognitive Decline

Moderate Omega-3 Diet May Slow Cognitive Decline

A new study suggests eating a meal of seafood or other foods containing omega-3 fatty acids at least once a week may protect against age-related memory loss and thinking problems in older people.

Researchers from Rush University Medical Center and Wageningen University in the Netherlands discovered study participants who reported eating seafood less than once a week experienced more rapid memory decline than those who ate at least one seafood meal per week.

The study helps to show that while cognitive abilities naturally decline as part of the normal aging process, there is something that we can do to mitigate this process,” says Martha Clare Morris, ScD, a Rush nutritional epidemiologist and senior author of the paper.

The research findings appear online in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

For the investigation, researchers followed 915 people with a mean age of 81.4 years for an average of five years. At study enrollment, none had signs of dementia.

Participants were recruited from people already taking part in the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a study of residents of more than 40 retirement communities and senior public housing units across northern Illinois, plus older adults identified through church groups and social service agencies.

During the course of the study, each person received annual, standardized testing for cognitive ability in five areas. Domains tested included episodic memory, working memory, semantic memory, visuospatial ability and perceptual speed.

The study group also completed annual food frequency questionnaires, allowing the researchers to compare participants’ reported seafood intake with changes in their cognitive abilities as measured by the tests.
by the tests.

The questionnaires included four types of seafood: tuna sandwiches; fish sticks, fish cakes and fish sandwiches; fresh fish as a main dish; and shrimp, lobster and crab. The participants were divided into two groups: those who ate at least one of those seafood meals per week and those who ate less than one of those seafood meals per week.

Participants in the higher seafood consumption group ate an average of two seafood meals per week. Those in the lower group ate an average of 0.5 meals per week.

Seafood is the direct nutrient source of a type of omega-3 fatty acid (docosahexaenoic acid) that is the main structural component of the brain. While epidemiologic studies have shown the importance of seafood and omega-3 fatty acids in preventing dementia, few prior studies have examined their associations with specific types of cognitive ability.

In the new study, the researchers report links or associations between seafood consumption and two of the areas of cognitive ability.

Specifically, people who ate more seafood had reduced rates of decline in the semantic memory, which is memory of verbal information. They also had slower rates of decline in a test of perceptual speed, or the ability to quickly compare letters, objects and patterns.

The study did not find a significant difference in the rate of decline in episodic memory (recollection of personal experiences), working memory (short-term memory used in mental function in the immediate present) and visuospatial ability (comprehension of relationships between objects).

The relationships held even when researchers adjusted for other factors that could affect memory and thinking skills, such as education, physical activity, smoking and participating in mentally stimulating activities.

Further, the protective association of seafood was even stronger among individuals with a common genotype (APOE-ε4) that increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

The APOE is a gene involved in cholesterol transport to neurons. About 20 percent of the population carries the APOE-ε4 gene, although not everyone who has the gene will develop Alzheimer’s disease.

Source: Rush University Medical Center
 
Fish dinner photo by shutterstock.

Moderate Omega-3 Diet May Slow Cognitive Decline

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Moderate Omega-3 Diet May Slow Cognitive Decline. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 20, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/05/12/moderate-omega-3-diet-may-slow-cognitive-decline/103124.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 11 May 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 11 May 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.