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'Left-Out' Kids Mimic Group Behaviors to Gain Acceptance

“Left-Out” Kids Mimic Group Behaviors to Gain Acceptance

New research finds that kids are no different from adults in copying behavior to be included in the “in” group.

Specifically, University of Texas researchers found the threat of ostracism influences children to imitate group behaviors as a means of re-affiliating.

Previous studies indicate that, when excluded, adults will mimic behaviors of others to increase “liking and rapport” in an attempt to be re-included; and now, researchers suggest children are no different.

“Humans have an evolutionary prepared ostracism-detection system,” said Rachel Watson-Jones, Ph.D., the lead author of the study and a postdoctoral researcher.

According to the study, children as young as five are sensitive to being excluded, especially from “in-groups” — those to which they feel they belong — and will respond using high-fidelity imitation to re-affiliate with those groups.

“When kids feel left out, they copy the behavior of others around them in order to appear more like them,” said Watson-Jones. “Whether it’s the way they dress, play, eat, or activities they participate in, a child will imitate the behavior of others to appear as though they are part of that group.”

In the study, researchers observed 176 children, ages five and six years old, as they played Cyberball, a virtual ball-tossing game, under four conditions. They looked at those ostracized from the in-group and those included, and those ostracized from the out-group and those included. “Ostracized” children were excluded from the two-minute game.

Additionally, researchers assessed children’s facial, postural, and verbal displays for anxiety and frustration, finding that children ostracized by the in-group displayed significantly more anxiety than those excluded from the out-group.

After the game, children watched an in-group or out-group member perform a pattern of arbitrary but intentional hand and object movements to simulate a group convention.

Saliently, children who had been excluded by the in-group imitated the actions with higher fidelity than children who had been included. However, children ostracized or included by the out-group did not differ in their imitative fidelity of the out-group convention.

Being left out of a perceived in-group can damage mental health for people of any age.

“The psychological experience of being ostracized by in-group members is aversive. Even young children are highly motivated to engage in behaviors such as group rituals to re-affiliate with other group members,” said associate professor of psychology Dr. Cristine Legare, a co-author of the study.

“Research demonstrates that the behavioral response to being ostracized emerges early in development.”

Examining the types of behaviors that children will imitate in response to ostracism, both positive and negative, is an important future direction for this research, Legare said.

Their paper appears in the journal Psychological Science.

Source: University of Texas/EurekAlert
 
Children jumping photo by shutterstock.

“Left-Out” Kids Mimic Group Behaviors to Gain Acceptance

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). “Left-Out” Kids Mimic Group Behaviors to Gain Acceptance. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 13, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/12/16/left-out-kids-imitate-group-behaviors-to-gain-acceptance/96306.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 16 Dec 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 16 Dec 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.