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“Sense of Purpose” Tied to Lower Cardio Risk & Longer Life

A new review discovers people who have a higher sense of purpose in life are at lower risk of death and cardiovascular disease.

The conclusion comes from an analysis of pooled data of 10 studies that involved more that 136,000 participants. The report appears in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society.

“Possessing a high sense of purpose in life is associated with a reduced risk for mortality and cardiovascular events,” according to Drs. Randy Cohen and Alan Rozanski and colleagues at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital, New York.

Although researchers are currently unable to pinpoint the biological mechanisms that are in play, the findings suggest that approaches to strengthening a sense of purpose might lead to improved health outcomes.

Using meta-analysis, the researchers pooled data from previous studies evaluating the relationship between purpose in life and the risk of death or cardiovascular disease.

The analysis included data on participants who mainly lived in the United States or Japan. The U.S. studies evaluated a sense of purpose or meaning in life, or “usefulness to others.” The Japanese studies assessed the concept of ikigai, translated as “a life worth living.”

The study participants, average age 67 years, were followed up for an average of seven years. During this time, more than 14,500 participants died from any cause while more than 4,000 suffered cardiovascular events (heart attack, stroke, etc).

The analysis showed a lower risk of death for participants with a high sense of purpose in life. After adjusting for other factors, mortality was about one-fifth lower for participants reporting a strong sense of purpose, or ikigai.

A high sense of purpose in life was also related to a lower risk of cardiovascular events. The beneficial effect was statistically significant in each country including how purpose in life was measured, and whether the studies included participants with pre-existing cardiovascular disease.

Researchers note that there is a well-documented link between “negative psychosocial risk factors” and adverse health outcomes, including heart attack, stroke, and overall mortality.

However, “more recent study provides evidence that positive psychosocial factors can promote healthy physiological functioning and greater longevity,” according to the authors.

The new analysis assembles high-quality data from studies assessing the relationship between purpose life and various measures of health and adverse clinical outcomes.

The researchers write, “Together, these findings indicate a robust relationship between purpose in life and mortality and/or adverse cardiovascular outcomes.”

While further studies are needed to determine how purpose in life might promote health and deter disease, preliminary data suggest a few basic mechanisms. The association might be explained physiologically, such as by buffering of bodily responses to stress; or behaviorally, such as by a healthier lifestyle.

“Of note, having a strong sense of life purpose has long been postulated to be an important dimension of life, providing people with a sense of vitality motivation and resilience,” said Rozanski.

“Nevertheless, the medical implications of living with a high or low sense of life purpose have only recently caught the attention of investigators. The current findings are important because they may open up new potential interventions for helping people to promote their health and sense of well-being.”

Source: Wolters Kluwer Health/EurekAlert

“Sense of Purpose” Tied to Lower Cardio Risk & Longer Life

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). “Sense of Purpose” Tied to Lower Cardio Risk & Longer Life. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 13, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/12/04/sense-of-purpose-tied-to-lower-cardiovascular-risk-and-enhanced-longevity/95736.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 4 Dec 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 4 Dec 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.