advertisement
Home » News » Does Romance Trump Prior Friendships & Change Behavior?
Does Romance Trump Prior Friendships and Change Behavior?

Does Romance Trump Prior Friendships & Change Behavior?

New research explores the hypothesis that adolescents become less similar to their friends and more similar to romantic partners after they start a new romantic relationship.

The complaint that a person is not the same after they began dating is a familiar lament. In the new study, researchers from Florida Atlantic University studied how people change when they enter a relationship and if health risk behaviors — such as alcohol consumption — also change or remain the same.

Investigators discovered adolescents who dated were more similar to dating partners than to friends on measures of alcohol abuse. Researchers also found evidence that non-daters who started dating changed from being more similar to friends to being more similar to romantic partners.

Investigators say this the first study to use longitudinal data to demonstrate changes in friend similarity that follow from the initiation of a romantic relationship.

The study has been published in the journal Developmental Psychology.

“The results confirm what most friends complain about — romantic partners are a distraction from friendships,” said Brett Laursen, Ph.D., one of the authors and a professor and graduate studies coordinator in the Department of Psychology.

“It also is a stark reminder how the peer social world changes during adolescence. Same-sex friends become less important and romantic affiliations become more important.”

Teens typically develop friendships with others who have similar habits and beliefs. Most single adolescents report friends to be among their most important relationships.

However, the start of a new romantic relationship alters the balance of close relationships. As romantic relationships surpass friendships in terms of importance, adolescents are inclined to change to become more similar to their romantic partners, even if it means that differences arise with friends.

“Much attention is given to the role that friends play in the acquisition and reinforcement of health-risk behaviors,” said Laursen.

“Adolescents rarely drink alone, so concerns over peer pressure to experiment with and abuse alcohol are well placed. Often overlooked, however, is the fact that initial involvement in romantic relationships tend to coincide with initial exposure to alcohol.”

Researchers used a two-part study to explore how dating can change friendships and behaviors.

In the first part of the study, participants (662 girls, 574 boys) ranging in age from 12 to 19 years, nominated friends and romantic partners, and completed a measure of alcohol abuse. Friends with romantic partners were less similar on rates of alcohol abuse than friends without romantic partners, especially if they were older and less well-liked by classmates.

The second part of the study focused on a subsample (266 boys, 374 girls) of adolescents who reported friendships that were stable across two consecutive years. At the outset, neither friend was involved in a romantic relationship.

Following participants over a 24 month period (a longitudinal subsample), made it possible to measure changes in friend similarity for those who did and did not begin a romantic relationship.

Researchers discovered similarity between friend reports of alcohol abuse declined after one or both of the adolescents became involved in a romantic relationship, to the point where they became more similar to their romantic partners than to their friends.

Levels of alcohol consumption did not differ for adolescents with romantic partners and adolescents without.

“The findings suggest that participation in a romantic relationship does not elevate the risk of alcohol abuse beyond that involved in participation in friendships,” said Laursen.

“Instead, it is the source of the risk that changes. Friends no longer shape drinking habits the way they used to. Romantic partners now dictate terms. Your friends were right: You aren’t the same person you were when you were single.”

Source: Florida Atlantic University/EurekAlert

Does Romance Trump Prior Friendships & Change Behavior?

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Does Romance Trump Prior Friendships & Change Behavior?. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/12/03/does-romance-trump-prior-friendships-and-change-behavior/95697.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 3 Dec 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 3 Dec 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.