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Mouse Study Suggests More Complex Role of Serotonin for Mood

Mouse Study Suggests More Complex Role of Serotonin for Mood

New research suggests the role of serotonin is more complex than typically assumed, a finding that may allow for the development of better drugs for depression and anxiety.

Serotonin in the brain is known to play a role in depression and anxiety, and it is customary to treat these disorders with medications that increase the amount of this neurotransmitter.

However, a new study suggests that this approach may be too simple.

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have discovered that neighboring serotonin-producing brainstem regions exert different and sometimes opposing effects on behavior.

The findings, published in the online edition of Cell Reports, provide new insights into the development of mood disorders and may aid in designing improved therapies.

“Our study breaks with the simplistic view that ‘more is good and less is bad,’ when it comes to serotonin for mood regulation,” said study leader Mark S. Ansorge, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychiatry at CUMC and research scientist at New York State Psychiatric Institute.

“Rather, it tells us that a more nuanced view is necessary.”

From anatomical studies, researchers knew that the brainstem contains two distinct clusters of neurons that produce serotonin: one in dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and another in the median raphe nucleus (MRN). Together both regions harbor the vast majority of neurons that supply serotonin to the rest of the brain, but it was unclear how neuronal activity within these clusters controls behavior.

To learn more, researchers used a technique called pharmacogenetics to control the activity of serotonergic neurons in the DRN and MRN in both normal mice and in a mouse model of depression- and anxiety-like behavior.

The model was created by giving mice the drug fluoxetine (Prozac) shortly after birth, which produces long-lasting behavioral changes. Investigators discovered alterations in serotonergic neuronal activity in the DRN and MRN produce markedly different behavioral consequences.

“Going into the study, our hypothesis was that reduced activity of serotonergic neurons is what drives these mood behaviors,” said Ansorge.

“But what we found was more complicated. First, it appears that hyperactivity of the MRN drives anxiety-like behavior. We also observed that decreased DRN activity increases depression-like behavior, while decreased MRN activity reduces it.

“This led us to conclude that an imbalance between DRN and MRN activity is what leads to depression-like behavior.”

“This new understanding of the raphe nuclei should help us better understand why certain medications are effective in treating depression and anxiety, and aid in designing new drugs,” Ansorge added.

“In the future, it may be possible to find treatments that selectively target the DRN or the MRN, or that correct any imbalance between the two.”

Jeffrey Lieberman, M.D., chair of the department of psychiatry at CUMC, observed that studies such as this are essential to understand the molecular mechanisms and impact of antidepressant treatments as this will lead to the development of more effective therapies.

The study also demonstrated, in experiments using the fluoxetine-treated mice, that inhibition of serotonin reuptake early in life leads to long-lasting imbalances between the DRN and MRN.

“This raises possible concerns about exposure to serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors during gestation,” said Ansorge.

“SSRIs cross the blood-brain barrier as well as the placenta, and bind maternal and fetal serotonin transporters alike. It’s too early to say whether this has any effect on behavior in humans, but it’s certainly something worth looking into.”

Source: Columbia University/EurekAlert

Mouse Study Suggests More Complex Role of Serotonin for Mood

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Mouse Study Suggests More Complex Role of Serotonin for Mood. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/11/23/mouse-study-suggest-complex-role-of-serotonin-for-mood/95255.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 23 Nov 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 23 Nov 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.