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Too High Parental Aspirations Can Hurt Child’s School Performance

Too High Parental Aspirations Can Hurt Child’s School Performance

New research from the U.K. suggests parental ambitions can benefit or harm a child’s academic achievement.

If a parents expectations are realistic, children tend to do better in school. However, if the goals are unrealistic, then the child may not perform well in school.

“Our research revealed both positive and negative aspects of parents’ aspiration for their children’s academic performance. Although parental aspiration can help improve children’s academic performance, excessive parental aspiration can be poisonous,” said lead author Kou Murayama, Ph.D., of the University of Reading.

The study was published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

Murayama and his colleagues analyzed data from a longitudinal study from 2002 to 2007 of 3,530 secondary school students (49.7 percent female) and their parents in Bavaria, Germany. The study assessed student math achievement as well as parental aspiration (how much they want their child to earn a particular grade) and expectation (how much they believe their child can achieve a certain grade) on an annual basis.

Researchers found that high parental aspiration led to increased academic achievement, but only when it did not overly exceed realistic expectation. When aspiration exceeded expectation, the children’s achievement decreased proportionately.

To reinforce the results, the researchers attempted to replicate the main findings of the study using data from a two-year study of more than 12,000 U.S. students and their parents. The results were similar to the German study and provided further evidence that parents’ overly high aspirations are associated with worse academic performance by their kids.

Previous psychological research has found the association between aspiration and academic achievement, but this study highlights a caveat, said Murayama.

“Much of the previous literature conveyed a simple, straightforward message to parents: Aim high for your children and they will achieve more,” said Murayama. “In fact, getting parents to have higher hopes for their children has often been a goal of programs designed to improve academic performance in schools.”

Investigators believe the study suggests that the focus of educational programs should not be on blindly increasing parental aspiration but on giving parents the information they need to develop realistic expectations.

“Unrealistically high aspiration may hinder academic performance. Simply raising aspiration cannot be an effective solution to improve success in education,” says Murayama.

Source: American Psychological Association/EurekAlert
 
Great student photo by shutterstock.

Too High Parental Aspirations Can Hurt Child’s School Performance

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Too High Parental Aspirations Can Hurt Child’s School Performance. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 22, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/11/18/unrealistic-parental-aspirations-can-harm-childs-school-performance/95020.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 21 Nov 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Nov 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.