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Mindfulness Training Improves Quality of Life with IBD

New research suggests meditation and other mindfulness-based techniques are helpful therapies to relieve stress and anxiety among individuals with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).

IBD is a chronic illness often associated with ongoing stress, anxiety, depression, and a general decline in quality of life.

“Our study provides support for the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a tailored mindfulness-based group intervention for patients with IBD,” concludes the research report by Dr. David Castle.

Castle and colleagues examined the value of mindfulness techniques to reduce IBD symptoms and relapses. To do this, they evaluated a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program tailored for 60 adults with IBD: Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.

The patients’ average age was 36 years, and average duration of IBD 11 years. Twenty-four patients had active disease at the time of the study.

The MBSR intervention consisted of eight weekly group sessions plus a daylong intensive session, led by an experienced instructor. The program included guided meditations, exercises designed to enhance mindfulness in daily life, and group discussions of challenges and experiences. Participants were also encouraged to perform daily “mindfulness meditation” at home.

Thirty-three patients agreed to participate in the MBSR intervention, 27 of whom completed the program. Ratings of mental health, quality of life, and mindfulness were compared to those of the 27 patients who chose not to participate (mainly because of travel time).

The MBSR participants had greater reductions in anxiety and depression scores, as well as improvement in physical and psychological quality of life. They also had higher scores on a questionnaire measuring various aspects of mindfulness — for example, awareness of inner and outer experiences.

Six months later, MBSR participants still had significant reduction in depression and improvement in quality of life, with a trend toward reduced anxiety. The patients were highly satisfied with the mindfulness intervention.

Anxiety, depression, and decreased quality of life are common in patients with IBD. Psychological distress may lead to increased IBD symptoms and play a role in triggering disease flare-ups. Previous studies have shown benefits of MBSR for patients with a wide range of physical illnesses, but there is limited evidence on mindfulness-based interventions for patients with IBD.

The new results show that the MBSR approach is feasible and well-accepted by patients with IBD. The study also suggests that training patients in mindfulness practices to follow in daily life can lead to significant and lasting benefits, including reduced psychological distress and improved quality of life.

Dr. Castle comments, “This work reinforces the interaction between physical and mental aspects of functioning, and underscores the importance of addressing both aspects in all our patients.”

The researchers point out some important limitations of their study — including the fact that patients weren’t randomly assigned to MBSR and control groups. They also note that the study didn’t assess the impact on measures of disease activity, including IBD flares.

Despite the observed benefits of mindfulness techniques for IBD, researchers call for a research design that incorporates a control group to clearly evaluate intervention effectiveness.

The study is published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, the official journal of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA).

Source: WOLTERS KLUWER HEALTH/EurekAlert

Mindfulness Training Improves Quality of Life with IBD

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Mindfulness Training Improves Quality of Life with IBD. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/11/06/mindfulness-training-improves-quality-of-life-with-ibd/94492.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Nov 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Nov 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.