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Messages that Provoke Fear Change Attitudes

Messages that Provoke Fear Change Attitudes

Debate over the effectiveness of fear-based messages has raged for decade’s. A new study suggests fear-based appeals are effective at influencing attitudes and behaviors, especially among women.

The finding comes from a comprehensive review of over 50 years of research on the topic as investigators discovered fear is a powerful motivator and change agent.

“These (fear-based) appeals are effective at changing attitudes, intentions, and behaviors. There are very few circumstances under which they are not effective and there are no identifiable circumstances under which they backfire and lead to undesirable outcomes,” said Dolores Albarracin, Ph.D., professor of psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The study has been published in the journal Psychological Bulletin.

Fear appeals are persuasive messages that emphasize the potential danger and harm that will befall individuals if they do not adopt the messages’ recommendations.

While these types of messages are commonly used in political, public health, and commercial advertising campaigns (e.g., smoking will kill you, Candidate A will destroy the economy), their use is controversial as academics continue to debate their effectiveness.

To help settle the debate, Albarracin and her colleagues conducted what they believe to be the most comprehensive meta-analysis to date. They looked at 127 research articles representing 248 independent samples and over 27,000 individuals from experiments conducted between 1962 and 2014.

They found fear appeals to be effective, especially when they contained recommendations for one-time only (versus repeated) behaviors and if the targeted audience included a larger percentage of women.

The investigators also confirmed prior findings that fear appeals are effective when they describe how to avoid the threat (e.g., get the vaccine, use a condom).

More important, said Albarracin, there was no evidence in the meta-analysis that fear appeals backfired to produce a worse outcome relative to a control group.

“Fear produces a significant though small amount of change across the board. Presenting a fear appeal more than doubles the probability of change relative to not presenting anything or presenting a low-fear appeal,” said Albarracin.

“However, fear appeals should not be seen as a panacea because the effect is still small. Still, there is no data indicating that audiences will be worse off from receiving fear appeals in any condition.”

She noted that the studies analyzed did not necessarily compare people who were afraid to people who were unafraid, but instead compared groups that were exposed to more or less fear-inducing content. Albarracin also recommended against using only fear-based appeals.

“More elaborate strategies, such as training people on the skills they will need to succeed in changing behavior, will likely be more effective in most contexts. It is very important not to lose sight of this,” she said.

Source: American Psychological Association/EuerkAlert

Messages that Provoke Fear Change Attitudes

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Messages that Provoke Fear Change Attitudes. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 10, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/10/23/messages-that-provoke-fear-change-attitudes/93861.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 23 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 23 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.