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Touch Instills Social Bonds

Touch Instills Social Bonds

The results from an informative new study suggest the “power” of touch is promulgated through a series of illusions coordinated by the brain. The sensory illusions, in turn, help to create a “social glue” that bonds people together.

Researchers give the example that the incredibly soft feeling we experience when we touch someone else’s skin may actually not represent reality.

In a series of studies led by Aikaterini Fotopoulou of the University College London, participants consistently rated the skin of another person as being softer than their own, whether or not it really was softer.

The researchers suggest that this phenomenon may exist to ensure that humans are motivated to build social bonds through touch.

“What is intriguing about the illusion is its specificity,” says Antje Gentsch, also of the University College London.

“We found the illusion to be strongest when the stroking was applied intentionally and according to the optimal properties of the specialized system in the skin for receiving affective touch.”

The skin system typically responds to slow, gentle stroking found in intimate relationships and encodes the pleasure of touch. In other words, this “social softness illusion” in the mind of the touch-giver is selective to the body parts and the stroking speeds that are most likely to elicit pleasure in the receiver.

“The illusion reveals a largely automatic and unconscious mechanism by which ‘giving pleasure is receiving pleasure’ in the touch domain,” Fotopoulou says.

Social touch is known to play a powerful role in human life — from infancy to old age — with beneficial effects on physical and mental health. Many studies have focused on the benefits of touch for the person receiving it.

For instance, premature infants benefit greatly from time spent in direct physical contact with their mothers. Yet, Fotopoulou and her colleagues say, remarkably little is known about the psychological benefits of actively touching others.

Earlier studies showed that softness and smoothness stimulate parts of the brain associated with emotion and reward. Therefore, this “illusion” that other people are softer ensures that reaching out and touching another person comes as its own reward.

This rewarding illusion acts as a kind of “social glue,” bonding people to each other. For example, touching a baby in a gentle manner seems to give the mother tactile pleasure, the researchers say. In fact, the feeling gives the mother pleasure over and above any other thoughts the mother may have in the moment.

Fotopoulou says the next step is to examine the neurophysiological mechanisms involved in giving affective touch.

Researchers are also curious to examine any differences that may exist in the experience of this softness illusion among partners, friends, and strangers.

Source: Cell Press/EurekAlert

Touch Instills Social Bonds

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Touch Instills Social Bonds. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/09/11/touch-instills-social-bonds/92109.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 11 Sep 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 11 Sep 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.