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Sexual Identity Influences Risk of an Eating Disorder

Sexual Identity Influences Risk of an Eating Disorder

New research suggests young women who are attracted to both sexes or who are unsure about who they are attracted to are more likely to develop an eating disorder than those attracted to only one sex.

Drexel University investigators, however, discovered females attracted to the same sex are no more likely to experience disordered eating symptoms than their peers with opposite-sex attractions.

This finding is contrary to previous assumptions that same-sex attraction plays a protective role against eating pathology in females.

“The results of this study suggests there may be notable differences in disordered eating symptoms across LGBQ persons,” said lead author Annie Shearer, outcomes research assistant for Drexel University’s Center for Family Intervention Science in the College of Nursing and Health Professions.

“Given the severe physical and emotional repercussions of eating disorders, these findings underscore the need for primary care physicians to ask about both sexuality and disordered eating symptoms during routine visits.”

The study also found that males who were attracted to other males or both sexes had higher rates of eating disorders than males only attracted to the opposite sex, which is supported by previous research.

“While there is a lot of research indicating gay and bisexual men exhibit higher rates of eating disorders than heterosexual men, findings have been mixed with respect to women,” said Shearer.

“Moreover, bisexual and — to an even greater degree — questioning persons are often excluded from these studies.”

The study, “The Relationship between Disordered Eating and Sexuality amongst Adolescents and Young Adults,” appears online and will be found in a forthcoming print issue of the journal Eating Behaviors.

Researchers recruited participants from ten primary care sites in Pennsylvania to examine disordered eating symptoms and sexuality in adolescents and young adults. During a routine visit, participants were administered a web-based Behavioral Health Screen to assess psychiatric symptoms and risk behaviors. More than 2,000 youths, ages 14-24, were surveyed.

Participants’ eating behaviors were evaluated through questions such as, how often do you think that you are fat even though some people say that you are skinny? How often do you try to control your weight by skipping meals? And, how often do you try to control your weight by making yourself throw up?

Sexual attraction was computed based on participants’ gender and to which sex participants reported they felt most attracted to: either males, females, both or not sure. In order to define sexual behavior, participants were asked whom they had engaged in sexual activities: males, females, or both.

As expected, males who were attracted to other males exhibited significantly higher disordered eating scores than those only attracted to members of the opposite sex. Males who engaged in sexual activities with other males also exhibited significantly higher scores than those who only engaged in sexual activities with females.

Amongst females, there were no significant differences in disordered eating scores between females who were only attracted to females and those only attracted to males. Those who reported being attracted to both sexes, however, had significantly higher scores, on average, than those only attracted to one sex.

Researchers surprised to discover that females who were unsure of who they were attracted to reported the highest disordered eating symptoms scores of all.

“This study highlights the need to increase sensitivity to the unique needs of sexual minority youth as a group and for the particularly sub groups in that population,” said Guy S. Diamond, Ph.D., associate professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, and co-author of the study.

“But it also demonstrates the value of standardized, comprehensive screening for mental health concerns in primary care.”

Source: Drexel University/EurekAlert
 
Eating disorders sign photo by shutterstock.

Sexual Identity Influences Risk of an Eating Disorder

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Sexual Identity Influences Risk of an Eating Disorder. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 10, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/09/03/sexual-identity-influences-risk-of-an-eating-disorder/91761.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.