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Failure Can Lead to Rewarding Experience

Failure Can Lead to Rewarding Experience

New imaging research provides quantifiable evidence of the wisdom of political leaders, scientists, educators, and parents on the valuable role of failure.

That is, failure is a rewarding experience when the brain has a chance to learn from its mistakes.

Scientists have long understood that the brain has two ways of learning. One is avoidance learning, which is a punishing, negative experience that trains the brain to avoid repeating mistakes.

The other is reward-based learning, a positive, reinforcing experience in which the brain feels rewarded for reaching the right answer.

A new MRI study by University of Southern California (USC) and a group of international researchers has found that having the opportunity to learn from failure can turn it into a positive experience, if the brain has a chance to learn from its mistakes.

“We show that, in certain circumstances, when we get enough information to contextualize the choices, then our brain essentially reaches towards the reinforcement mechanism, instead of turning toward avoidance,” said Dr. Giorgio Coricelli, a USC associate professor of economics and psychology.

For the study, researchers engaged 28 subjects, each around 26 years old, in a series of questions that challenged them to maximize their gains by providing the right answers. If they chose a wrong answer, they lost money, while right answers helped them earn money.

One trial prompted their brains to respond to getting the wrong answer with avoidance learning. A second trial prompted a reward-based learning reaction, and a third but separate trial tested whether participants had learned from their mistakes, allowing them to review and understand what they got wrong.

In that third round, the participants responded positively, activating areas in their brains that some scientists call the “reward circuit” or the ventral striatum.

This experience mimicked the brain’s reward-based learning response — as opposed to an avoidance-learning response, an experience that involves different parts of the brain that together comprise the anterior insula.

Coricelli said this process is similar to what the brain experiences when feeling regret: “With regret, for instance, if you have done something wrong, then you might change your behavior in the future,” he said.

Source: USC

Failure Can Lead to Rewarding Experience

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Failure Can Lead to Rewarding Experience. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 26, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/08/26/failure-can-lead-to-rewarding-experience/91368.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.