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Mouse Study Gives Clues on Deep Sleep

Mouse Study Gives Clues on Deep Sleep

Experts have long been puzzled that the brain responds differently to stimuli when asleep than when awake.

“It is the same brain, same neurons, and similar requirements for oxygen and so on, so what is the difference between these two states?” asked Dr. Rodolfo Llinás, a professor of neuroscience at New York University School of Medicine.

In a recent paper, Llinás announced that a specific calcium channel plays a crucial role in healthy sleep, a key step toward understanding both normal and abnormal waking brain functions.

To tackle the broad question of sleep, Llinás and his colleagues focused on one crucial part of the puzzle in mice.

Calcium channels, selective gates in neuron walls, are integral in neuron firing, ensuring that all parts of the brain keep talking to one other. But during sleep, calcium channel activity is increased, keeping a slow rhythm that is different from patterns found during wakefulness.

Based on this clue, the scientists removed one type of calcium channel, Cav3.1, and looked at how the absence of that channel’s activity affected mouse brain function.

This calcium channel turns out to be a key player in normal sleep.

The mice without working Cav3.1 calcium channels took longer to fall asleep than normal mice, and stayed asleep for much shorter periods. “They basically took cat naps,” said Llinás.

Their brain activity was also abnormal, more like normal wakefulness than sleep. Most importantly, these mice never reached deep, slow-wave sleep. “This means that we have discovered that Cav3.1 is the channel that ultimately supports deep sleep,” Llinás said.

Because these mice completely lack the ability to sleep deeply, they eventually express a syndrome similar to psychiatric disorders in humans.

Llinás believes that studying how the brain functions during unconsciousness is key to understanding normal consciousness, as well as abnormal brain activity.

Experts believe the new finding will help scientists uncover one of the key mechanisms of normal sleep, as well as the role for one important calcium channel in overall brain function.

Source: Marine Biological Laboratory/EurekAlert

Mouse Study Gives Clues on Deep Sleep

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Mouse Study Gives Clues on Deep Sleep. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/06/29/mouse-study-gives-clues-on-deep-sleep/86230.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.