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Is Brain Composition Different Among Emotional and Rational People ?

Is Brain Composition Different Among Emotional and Rational People ?

A new study discovers physical differences in the brains of people who respond emotionally to others’ feelings, compared to those who respond more rationally.

Researcher Robert Eres, from Monash University, identified correlations between grey matter density and cognitive and affective empathy. The study, published in the journal NeuroImage, looked at whether people who have more brain cells in certain areas of the brain are better at different types of empathy.

“People who are high on affective empathy are often those who get quite fearful when watching a scary movie, or start crying during a sad scene. Those who have high cognitive empathy are those who are more rational, for example a clinical psychologist counselling a client,” Mr Eres said.

The researchers used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to examine the extent to which grey matter density in 176 participants predicted their scores on tests that rated their levels for cognitive empathy compared to affective — or emotional — empathy.

The results showed that people with high scores for affective empathy had greater grey matter density in the insula, a region found right in the “middle” of the brain.

Those who scored higher for cognitive empathy had greater density in a different area of the brain — the midcingulate cortex — an area above the corpus callosum, which connects the two hemispheres of the brain.

Investigators believe these findings show that affective and cognitive empathy are represented in difference brain structures as well as different neural networks.

The findings raise further questions about whether some kinds of empathy could be increased through training, or whether people can lose their capacity for empathy if they don’t use it enough.

“Every day people use empathy with, and without, their knowledge to navigate the social world,” said Mr Eres.

“We use it for communication, to build relationships, and consolidate our understanding of others.”

However, the discovery also raises new questions — like whether people could train themselves to be more empathic, and would those areas of the brain become larger if they did, or whether we can lose our ability to empathize if we don’t use it enough.

“In the future we want to investigate causation by testing whether training people on empathy related tasks can lead to changes in these brain structures and investigate if damage to these brain structures, as a result of a stroke for example, can lead to empathy impairments,” said Mr Eres.

Source: Monash University

Is Brain Composition Different Among Emotional and Rational People ?

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Is Brain Composition Different Among Emotional and Rational People ?. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 17, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/06/19/is-brain-composition-different-among-emotional-and-rational-people/85874.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.