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Impulsivity Tied to Binge Eating

Impulsivity Tied to Binge Eating

Researchers have discovered that the more impulsive you are, the more likely it is you’ll binge eat when experiencing negative feelings.

Kelly Klump, a professor of psychology at Michigan State University and senior author of the new study says overeating when a person is upset may stem from an individual seeking the rewarding effects of food.

‘It’s human nature to want to turn to something for comfort after a bad day, but what our research found is that the tendency to act rashly when faced with negative emotions is a personality trait that can lead to binge eating,’ Klump said.

Binge eating — the uncontrollable consumption of a large amount of food in a short period of time — doesn’t just happen because someone’s had a rotten day, it’s tied to how impulsive you are.

The study has been published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Klump and her team interviewed 612 female twins, of which 14 percent had binge eating, overeating (consumption of a large amount of food without a loss of control), or loss of control over eating (difficulty controlling one’s consumption of even a small amount of food).

They determined that people with these eating problems generally had higher levels of ‘negative urgency,’ or a tendency to act impulsively when experiencing negative emotions, than those who did not have pathological eating.

What’s more, it’s not just those with binge eating who act impulsively when upset. “Both overeating and feeling out of control when eating small or normal amounts of food were related to rash action when experiencing negative emotions,” said Sarah Racine, assistant professor of psychology at Ohio University and lead author on the research.

Although negative urgency was high in those people who set out to overeat and those who lose control when eating, Racine believes there may be different factors at play for these two types of problem eating.

‘It is possible that relationships between binge eating and negative urgency reflect impairments in behavioral control over eating when upset,” said Racine. “Overeating may instead represent increased sensitivity to rewarding effects of food in the context of negative emotions.”

This research has important implications for treatment, Klump said. “If we can treat the underlying tendency to jump to eating when feeling negative emotions like stress, we may be able to help thousands of individuals who suffer from a range of eating disorders.”

Source: Michigan State University/EurekAlert!

Impulsivity Tied to Binge Eating

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Impulsivity Tied to Binge Eating. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/05/29/impulsivity-tied-to-binge-eating/85116.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.