Home » News » Genes Influence Sensitivity to Emotions
Genes Influence Sensitivity to Emotions

Genes Influence Sensitivity to Emotions

It is common knowledge that everyone has a different level of sensitivity to emotional information. Some of us cry at the mere thought of something sad while others remain indifferent even in the gloomiest of circumstances.

Similar observations can also be made about the way we emotionally react to happiness and a variety of other emotions.

New research suggests a person’s genes may influence how sensitive a person is to emotional information.

The study, recently published in The Journal of Neuroscience, found that carriers of a certain genetic variation perceived positive and negative images more vividly, and had heightened activity in certain brain regions.

“People really do see the world differently,” says lead author Rebecca Todd, a professor in University of British Columbia’s Department of Psychology.

“For people with this gene variation, the emotionally relevant things in the world stand out much more.”

The gene in question is ADRA2b, which influences the neurotransmitter norepinephrine. Previous research by Todd found that carriers of a deletion variant of this gene showed greater attention to negative words.

Her latest research is the first to use brain imaging to find out how the gene affects how vividly people perceive the world around them, and the results were startling, even to Todd.

“We thought, from our previous research, that people with the deletion variant would probably show this emotionally enhanced vividness, and they did more than we would even have predicted,” says Todd, who scanned the brains of 39 participants, 21 of whom were carriers of the genetic variation.

Carriers of the gene variation showed significantly more activity in a region of the brain responsible for regulating emotions and evaluating both pleasure and threat. Todd believes this may help explain why some people are more susceptible to PTSD and intrusive memories following trauma.

“Emotions are not only about how we feel about the world, but how our brains influence our perception of it,” says Adam Anderson, professor of human development at Cornell University and senior author of the study.

“As our genes influence how we literally see the positive and negative aspects of our world more clearly, we may come to believe the world has more rewards or threats.” Todd points out there are also benefits to carrying the gene variant.

“People who have the deletion variant are drawing on an additional network in their brains important for calculating the emotional relevance of things in the world,” she says. In any situation where noticing what’s relevant in the environment is important, this gene variation would be a positive.”

Todd says a prime example of a carrier of this variation was French novelist Marcel Proust: “He bit into the Madeleine cookie and then wrote seven volumes of memoirs,” she says.

“He probably was emotionally sensitive too and he was certainly creative. He’s a classic deletion carrier.

Source: University of British Columbia/EurekAlert!

Genes Influence Sensitivity to Emotions

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Genes Influence Sensitivity to Emotions. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 26, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/05/08/genes-influence-sensitivity-to-emotions/84397.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.