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Teen Risk-taking Explained by Brain Activity

Imaging Shows How Mom’s Presence Dampens Teen Risk-Taking

Imaging studies of teenage brains show how the presence of a parent reduces blood flow to areas of the brain associated with risk-taking.

The research demonstrated how adolescent brains negotiate driving risk and the factors that reduce their risk-taking while behind the wheel. Findings reveal how immature actions (risk-taking) are associated with blood flow to particular areas of the brain.

As reported in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, the study had 14-year-old subjects perform a simulated driving task while researchers tracked blood flow in their brains. In one trial, the teen driver was alone; in another, the teen’s mother was present and watching.

Dr. Laurence Steinberg, a professor of psychology at Temple University, developed the driving task and evaluated how the presence of peers influenced teen risk-taking, said University of Illinois psychology professor Dr. Eva Telzer , who led the study.

“He found that peers significantly increase risk-taking among teens,” Telzer said. “I wanted to know whether we could reduce risk-taking by bringing a parent into the car.”

Telzer and her colleagues observed that teens driving alone found risky decisions rewarding. Blood flow to the ventral striatum, a “reward center” in the brain, increased significantly when teen drivers chose to ignore a yellow stoplight and drove through the intersection anyway.

Previous research has demonstrated that the ventral striatum is more sensitive to rewards in adolescence than during any other developmental period, Telzer said. “The prevailing view is that this peak in reward sensitivity in adolescence underlies, in part, adolescent risk-taking,” she said.

A mother’s presence, however, blunted the thrill of running the yellow light, Telzer and her colleagues found.

“When mom is there, the heightened ventral striatum activation during risky decisions goes away,” Telzer said. “Being risky, it appears, is no longer rewarding in the presence of mom.”

Not surprisingly, teens stepped on the brakes significantly more often at yellow lights when their moms were present than when they were alone.

“The teens go from about 55 percent risky choices to about 45 percent when their mom is watching,” Telzer said. “That’s a big effect.”

Another brain region, the prefrontal cortex, kicked into gear when the teens put on the brakes, but only when their mom was watching, the researchers found. The PFC is important to behavioral regulation, also called “cognitive control,” Telzer said.

“When they make safe decisions, when they choose to stop instead of going through that intersection, the prefrontal cortex comes online,” she said. “It’s activated when mom is there, but not when they’re alone.”

The PFC (the control center) and the ventral striatum (the reward center) are key brain regions involved in adolescent risk-taking behavior, Telzer said. But in the absence of a well-developed control center, adolescents are more susceptible to the stimulating allure of risky behavior.

“Here we’re showing that mom reduces the rewarding nature of risk-taking and increases activation of the prefrontal cortex during safe behavior,” Telzer said.

“And so these two mechanisms help adolescents to think twice before running the intersection. A parent’s presence is actually changing the way the adolescent is reasoning and thinking about risk — and this increases their safe behavior.”

Source: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign/EurekAlert!

Imaging Shows How Mom’s Presence Dampens Teen Risk-Taking

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Imaging Shows How Mom’s Presence Dampens Teen Risk-Taking. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 17, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/04/23/teen-risk-taking-explained-by-brain-activity/83814.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.