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Healthy Changes More Successful If Partner Involved

Healthy Changes More Successful If Partner Involved

New research finds that people are more likely to improve their health habits when their partner makes positive changes too.

Researchers from University College London (UCL), the British Heart Foundation and the U.S. National Institute on Aging looked at how likely people were to quit smoking, start being active, or lose weight in relation to what their partner did.

Their findings are published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

They found that people were more successful in swapping bad habits for good ones if their partner made a change as well.

For example, among women who smoked, 50 percent managed to quit if their partner gave up smoking too at the same time, compared with 17 percent of women whose partners were already non-smokers, and eight percent of those whose partners were regular smokers.

The study found that men were equally affected by their partners and were more likely to quit smoking, get active, or lose weight if their partner made the same behavior change.

Investigators looked at 3,722 couples, either married or living together and over the age of 50, who were taking part in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA).

Professor Jane Wardle, of the Health Behavior Research Centre at UCL and one of the study authors, said, “Unhealthy lifestyles are a leading cause of death from chronic disease worldwide.

“The key lifestyle risks are smoking, excess weight, physical inactivity, poor diet, and alcohol consumption. Swapping bad habits for good ones can reduce the risk of disease, including cancer.”

Dr. Sarah Jackson, lead author of the study at UCL, said, “Now is the time to make New Year’s resolutions to quit smoking, take exercise, or lose weight. And doing it with your partner increases your chances of success.”

Dr. Julie Sharp, Cancer Research U.K.’s head of health information, said, “Making lifestyle changes can make a big difference to our health and cancer risk. And this study shows that when couples make those changes together they are more likely to succeed.

“Getting some support can help people take up good habits. For example if you want to lose weight and have a friend or colleague who’s trying to do the same thing you could encourage each other by joining up for a run or a swim at lunchtime or after work. And local support such as stop smoking services are very effective at helping people to quit.

“Keeping healthy by not smoking, maintaining a healthy body weight and being active can all lower the risk of cancer, and the more people can help and encourage each other the better.”

Source: Cancer Research UK

 
Couple getting fit together photo by shutterstock.

Healthy Changes More Successful If Partner Involved

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Healthy Changes More Successful If Partner Involved. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 24, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/01/20/health-behavioral-change-works-best-when-partner-involved/80158.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.