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Healthy Habits Significantly Reduce Heart Disease in Young Women

Healthy Habits Significantly Reduce Heart Disease in Young Women

New research suggests healthy lifestyle practices can significantly lower the risk for heart attack among women.

Investigators from Indiana University, the Harvard School of Public Health, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital analyzed the diet and health habits of nearly 70,000 women nurses for two decades.

From this review, they determined that three-quarters of heart attacks in young women could be prevented if women closely followed six healthy lifestyle practices.

The study is published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

“Although mortality rates from heart disease in the U.S. have been in steady decline for the last four decades, women aged 35-44 have not experienced the same reduction,” said Andrea K. Chomistek, ScD, lead author of the paper.

“This disparity may be explained by unhealthy lifestyle choices. We wanted to find out what proportion of heart disease cases could be attributed to unhealthy habits.”

Healthy habits were defined as not smoking, a normal body mass index, physical activity of at least 2.5 hours per week, watching seven or fewer hours of television a week, consumption of a maximum of one alcoholic drink per day on average, and a healthy diet based on published standards.

During 20 years of follow-up, 456 women had heart attacks and 31,691 women were diagnosed with one or more cardiovascular disease risk factors, including type II diabetes, high blood pressure, or high levels of blood cholesterol.

The average age of women in the study was 37.1 years at the outset; the average age of a heart disease diagnosis was 50.3, and the average age for diagnosis with a risk factor for heart disease was 46.8.

Researchers found that women who adhered to all six healthy lifestyle practices had a 92 percent lower risk of heart attack and a 66 percent lower risk of developing a risk factor for heart disease.

This lower risk would mean three quarters of heart attacks and nearly half of all risk factors in younger women may have been prevented if all of the women had adhered to all six healthy lifestyle factors, the authors said.

For women who were diagnosed with a risk factor, adherence to at least four of the healthy lifestyle factors was associated with a significantly lower risk of going on to develop heart disease when compared to those who did not follow any of the healthy lifestyle practices.

Not smoking, adequate physical activity, better diet, and lower BMI were each associated with a lower risk for heart disease. Women who consumed moderate amounts of alcohol — approximately one drink per day on average — saw the lowest risk compared to those who did not drink at all and those who drank more.

“This is an important public health message,” said Chomistek.

“Women should begin following these lifestyle practices early in life, especially if they are already taking medication for a risk factor such as hypertension or high cholesterol. It’s an easy way to prevent future heart trouble.”

Source: American College of Cardiology

 
Healthy living photo by shutterstock.

Healthy Habits Significantly Reduce Heart Disease in Young Women

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Healthy Habits Significantly Reduce Heart Disease in Young Women. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 10, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2015/01/07/healthy-habits-significantly-reduce-heart-disease-in-young-women/79576.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.