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Fine Particle Air Pollutants Linked to Autism

Fine Particle Air Pollutants Linked to Autism

New research suggests that women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter air pollution during pregnancy may experience double the risk of having a child with autism.

Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) says the risk is greatest when the exposure occurs during the third trimester. The greater the exposure, the greater the risk, researchers found.

Investigators say this is the first U.S.-wide study to explore the link between airborne particulate matter and autism.

“Our data add additional important support to the hypothesis that maternal exposure to air pollution contributes to the risk of autism spectrum disorders,” said Marc Weisskopf, associate professor of environmental and occupational epidemiology and senior author of the study.

“The specificity of our findings for the pregnancy period, and third trimester in particular, rules out many other possible explanations for these findings.”

The study appears online in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Previous research had hypothesized that air pollution — particularly during pregnancy and early life — in addition to genetics, may affect risk of autism. This study focused specifically on the pregnancy period.

The study population included offspring of participants living in all 50 states in Nurses’ Health Study II, a cohort of more than 116,000 female U.S. nurses begun in 1989.

The researchers collected data on where participants lived during their pregnancies as well as data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other sources on levels of fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) — particles 2.5 microns in diameter or smaller — in locations across the U.S.

The researchers identified 245 children who were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and a control group of 1,522 children without ASD during the time period studied.

The researchers explored the association between autism and exposure to PM2.5 before, during, and after pregnancy. They also calculated exposure to PM2.5 during each pregnancy trimester.

Exposure to PM2.5 was significantly associated with autism during pregnancy, but not before or after, the study found. And during the pregnancy, the third trimester specifically was significantly associated with an increased risk.

Interestingly, exposure to larger particle (PN10-2.5) air pollution was associated with only a very small risk of autism.

“The evidence base for a role for maternal exposure to air pollution increasing the risk of autism spectrum disorders is becoming quite strong,” said Weisskopf.

“This not only gives us important insight as we continue to pursue the origins of autism spectrum disorders, but as a modifiable exposure, opens the door to thinking about possible preventative measures.”

Source: Harvard School of Public Health

 
Pregnant woman wearing a mask because of polluted air photo by shutterstock.

Fine Particle Air Pollutants Linked to Autism

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Fine Particle Air Pollutants Linked to Autism. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/12/19/fine-particle-air-pollutants-linked-to-autism/78839.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.