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Worksite Creativity Bolstered by Political Correctness

Worksite Creativity Bolstered by Political Correctness

New research suggests the perceived link between political correctness (PC) and conformity may be twisted.

Investigators found that, paradoxically, imposing a norm that sets clear expectations of how women and men should interact with each other into a work environment encourages creativity among mixed-sex work groups.

Researchers believe the enhanced creativity stems from a reduction of ambiguity or relationship uncertainty.

The study highlights a puzzling consequence of the political correctness norm. While PC behavior is generally thought to threaten the free expression of ideas, University of California, Berkeley Professor Jennifer Chatman, Ph.D., and her co-authors found that positioning such PC norms as the office standard provides a layer of safety in the workplace that fosters creativity.

“Creativity is essential to organizational innovation and growth. But our research departs from the prevailing theory of group creativity by showing that creativity in mixed-sex groups emerges, not by removing behavioral constraints, but by imposing them.

“Setting a norm that both clarifies expectations for appropriate behavior and makes salient the social sanctions that result from using sexist language unleashes creative expression by countering the uncertainty that arises in mixed-sex work groups,” said Chatman.

The study is forthcoming in the journal Administrative Science Quarterly.

“Our contention is controversial because many have argued that imposing the PC norm might not just eliminate offensive behavior and language but will also cause people to filter out and withhold potentially valuable ideas and perspectives,” Chatman said.

“We suggest that this critical view of the PC norm reflects a deeply rooted theoretical assumption that normative constraints inevitably stifle creative expression — an assumption we challenge.”

The authors designed their experiments taking into account the different incentives men and women have for adhering to the PC norm. Men said they were motivated to adhere to a PC norm because of concerns about not being overbearing and offending women.

Whereas one might expect women to perceive a PC norm as emblematic of weakness or conformity, women in the experiment became more confident about expressing their ideas out loud when the PC norm was salient or prominent.

In contrast, in work groups that were homogeneous — all men or all women — a salient PC norm had no impact on the group’s creativity compared to the control group.

Study participants were randomly divided into mixed sex groups and same sex groups. Next, researchers asked the groups to describe the value of PC behavior before being instructed to work together on a creative task.

The control groups were not exposed to the PC norm before beginning their creative task. The task involved brainstorming ideas on a new business entity to be housed in a property left vacated by a mismanaged restaurant — by design, a project that has no right or wrong strategy.

Instead of stifling their ideas, mixed-sex groups exposed to the PC norm performed more creatively by generating a significantly higher number of divergent and novel ideas than the control group.

As expected, same sex groups generated fewer creative outcomes. (Previous studies have found that homogenous groups are less creative because people in these groups are similar to one another with similar ideas and therefore, less divergent thinking occurs.)

Source: University of California, Berkeley

 

Group of happy employees photo by shutterstock.

Worksite Creativity Bolstered by Political Correctness

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Worksite Creativity Bolstered by Political Correctness. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/12/03/worksite-creativity-bolstered-by-political-correctness/78127.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.