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Bipolar Disorder May Hike Risk of Premature Birth

Bipolar Disorder May Hike Risk of Premature Birth

New research suggests women who have been hospitalized for bipolar disorder are nearly twice as likely to have premature babies compared to women without a history of mental illness.

Investigators from Women’s College Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), both in Toronto, Canada, compared the health records of women previously hospitalized for bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, to the general population.

The discovered women with bipolar disorder are at 50 percent greater risk of delivering preterm babies and having other serious complications.

The study has been published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Although the study did not examine the causes that led to these findings, the researchers suggest that women may be able to reduce risk to their babies by modifying lifestyle and behavioral factors.

“Bipolar disorder is the sixth leading cause of disability among women of reproductive age and yet research tells us very little about how to ensure the best possible outcomes for mothers and babies,” said psychiatrist Dr. Simone Vigod, lead author of the study.

“Knowing the potential impact it may have, as well as any modifiable risk factors, will help us as doctors provide the best treatment possible for our patients.”

In the study, the researchers examined the health records of women who delivered a single baby from 2003 to 2011.

The researchers compared women previously hospitalized for bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, to the general population. They found:

  • women with bipolar disorder were twice as likely to have preterm birth compared to women without a history of mental illness;
  • babies born to women with bipolar disorder were more likely to be large for their gestational age, in contrast to babies born to women with depression who were more likely to be born small for their gestational age;
  • babies born to women with bipolar disorder were more likely to have higher rates of congenital malformations and other complications;
  • babies born to women with bipolar disorder were more likely to be readmitted to hospital within 28 days of discharge.

“Outcomes like preterm birth are concerning, because they are known to negatively impact health in childhood and later adulthood,” added Vigod.

“While we don’t know the exact cause of preterm birth and other negative outcomes, we do know mental health symptoms can promote the secretion of stress hormones that can lead to preterm birth.”

Additional factors that may play a role in preterm births are psychiatric medications, genetics, health, and low socioeconomic status.

“Lifestyle behaviors can also influence premature birth with factors including a lack of exercise and obesity, poor nutrition and smoking,” said Vigod.

Source: Women’s College Hospital/EurekAlert

Bipolar Disorder May Hike Risk of Premature Birth

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Bipolar Disorder May Hike Risk of Premature Birth. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/11/04/bipolar-associated-with-strong-risk-of-premature-infant/76950.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.