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Group Classes for Parents Teach Home Therapy for Autistic Kids

Group Classes for Parents Teach Home Therapy for Autistic Kids

Use of a group setting to train parents on autistic therapy appears to be a beneficial method to improve language skills in their autistic children.

Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford found that parents can learn to use a scientifically validated autism therapy with their own children by taking a short series of group classes

The therapy helped children improve their language skills, an area of deficiency in autism, according to a study published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

The study is the first randomized, controlled trial to test whether group classes are a good way to train parents on using an autism therapy.

“We’re teaching parents to become more than parents,” said the study’s lead author, Antonio Hardan, M.D., professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

“What we’re most excited about is that parents are able to learn this intervention and implement it with their kids.”

The treatment is not intended to replace autism therapies administered by professionals, but rather to improve parents’ ability to help their children learn from everyday interactions.

“There are two benefits: The child can make progress, and the parents leave the treatment program better equipped to facilitate the child’s development over the course of their daily routines,” said study co-author Grace Gengoux, Ph.D.

“The ways that parents instinctually interact with children to guide language development may not work for a child with autism, which can frustrate parents. Other studies have shown that learning this treatment reduces parents’ stress and improves their happiness. Parents benefit from knowing how to help their children learn.”

Over the course of 12-weeks parents were trained in a technique called pivotal response training, a method that has been shown to help children with autism.

To use the treatment for building language skills, parents identify something the child wants and systematically reward the child for trying to talk about it.

For instance, if the child reaches for a ball, the parent says, “Do you want the ball? Say ‘ball.’”

“The child might say ‘ba,’ and you reward him by giving him the ball,” Hardan said. “Parents can create opportunities for this treatment to work at the dinner table, in the park, in the car, while they’re out for a walk.”

The method has roots in other behavioral therapies for autism, such as applied behavior analysis, but is more flexible than many such programs and makes greater use of the child’s own interests and motivations.

Parents can create opportunities for this treatment to work at the dinner table, in the park, in the car, while they’re out for a walk.

Fifty-three children with autism and their parents participated in the study. The children ranged in age from two to six. All had language delays.

The parents were randomly assigned to one of two groups: The experimental group attended 12 weeks of classes on pivotal response training, and the control group attended a 12-week program offering basic information about autism.

The children’s verbal skills were measured at the start of the study, at six weeks and at 12 weeks. At six and 12 weeks, the parents in the experimental group were video-recorded while using pivotal response training so that researchers could assess whether they were using the treatment correctly.

At the end of the study, 84 percent of parents who received instruction in pivotal response training were using the therapy correctly.

Their children showed greater gains in language skills — both in the number of things they said and in their functional use of words — than children in the control group.

The researchers were encouraged to see that the group-based approach to training parents was successful and produced results quickly for the children.

Rising rates of autism diagnosis have made it difficult for clinicians to meet the demand for their expertise, and groups are an efficient way to train parents. Parents also liked having the opportunity to learn from one another.

“Parents really do feel more empowered when they’re in a group setting,” said study co-author Kari Berquist, Ph.D., a clinical instructor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences and an autism clinician at the hospital.

“They’re talking, connecting, sharing their experiences. It gives them a sense of community.”

The study provided an early hint about which children on the autism spectrum might benefit most from pivotal response training: Children with the best visual problem-solving abilities improved most with the treatment.

In future studies, the researchers hope to identify good predictors of which autism therapies fit best for different children and families. They are also testing different lengths and intensities of pivotal response training to see what produces the best results.

Source: Stanford University School of Medicine

Group Classes for Parents Teach Home Therapy for Autistic Kids

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Group Classes for Parents Teach Home Therapy for Autistic Kids. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/10/30/group-classes-for-parents-teach-home-therapy-for-autistic-kids/76754.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.