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Depressed People Believe in Better Life Ahead

Depressed People Believe in Better Life Ahead

A new study finds that even depressed people are optimistic about the future.

However, researchers also discovered the positive outlook may not lead to better outcomes.

Canadian researchers found that middle-aged adults with a history of depression typically evaluated their past and current lives in more negative terms than did adults without depression.

Yet, the negativity didn’t extend to their beliefs about the future.

“It turns out that even clinically depressed individuals are also characterized by the belief that one’s life in the future will be more satisfying than one’s past and current life,” said psychological scientist and lead researcher Michael Busseri, Ph.D., of Brock University in Canada.

“And this pattern of beliefs appears to be a risk factor for future depression, even over a 10-year period.”

Adults typically believe that life gets better — today is better than yesterday was and tomorrow will be even better than today.

The findings are published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science.

Busseri and co-author Emily Peck of Acadia University, also in Canada, analyzed data available from the Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) survey, a nationally representative sample of middle-aged Americans.

The researchers looked at data from both waves of the study, collected 10 years apart. They limited their sample to those participants who were 45 years old or younger at the first wave.

In addition to demographic data, the researchers looked at participants’ reports of life satisfaction for the past, present, and future.

Participants were asked to rate their life satisfaction on a scale from zero to 10, from worst life possible to best life possible. They also examined symptoms of depression measured via clinical interview.

Compared to non-depressed participants, MIDUS participants who showed signs of depression reported lower levels of life satisfaction at each time point: past, present, and future.

Like non-depressed participants, however, the depressed participants seemed to think that life would get better over time.

And yet, the discrepancy between optimistic beliefs about the future and a more sober reality might contribute to sub-optimal outcomes for these individuals.

“What we don’t know yet is whether this improved future life is actually something that depressed individuals feel they will achieve,” Busseri said.

“It’s possible, for example, that envisioning a brighter future is a form of wishful thinking — rather than a sign of encouragement and hope.”

Looking at the participants’ subjective trajectories across all three time points, the researchers found that non-depressed participants showed linear increases in life satisfaction from one point to the next, but depressed participants did not.

Instead, they tended to show a relatively flat trajectory between past and current life satisfaction and then a significant increase between current and future life satisfaction.

Busseri and Peck also found that relatively low ratings of past and current life satisfaction were each associated with a higher risk of depression 10 years later. This even after taking various demographic characteristics and baseline levels of depression into account.

Taken together, these findings suggest that subjective trajectories may be an important point of intervention for people suffering from or at risk of depression.

“The fact that even depressed individuals can envision their lives being more satisfying in the future may provide clinicians and mental health workers with a valuable new avenue for intervention, for example, through focusing on helping individuals develop concrete goals and realistic plans for achieving a more satisfying future life,” said Busseri.

“An important next step is determine whether modifying individuals’ subjective trajectories — making them more realistic, or ‘flatter’ — might attenuate symptoms of depression, or longer-term risk of depression.”

Source: Association for Psychological Science

 
Man thinking about the future photo by shutterstock.

Depressed People Believe in Better Life Ahead

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Depressed People Believe in Better Life Ahead. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/10/22/depressed-people-believe-in-better-life-ahead/76452.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.