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Depression Ups Smoking Cessation Challenge – Exercise Helpful

Depression Ups Smoking Cessation Challenge – Exercise Helpful

Smoking is often associated with depression with the mood disorder making it much more difficult to kick the habit.

Often those that have the hardest time shaking off the habit may have more mental health issues than they are actually aware of.

Those insights were some of the findings recently published in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research by a team of Canadian researchers.

While nearly one in five North American adults are regular smokers — a number that continues to steadily decline — about 40 percent of depressed people are in need of a regular smoke.

This revelation motivated researchers to investigate the underpinnings of the behavior.

The findings revealed that those who struggle with mental illness simply have a tougher time quitting, no matter how much they want to.

The anxiety, cravings, or lack of sleep that accompany typical attempts to quit cold turkey will have them scrambling for the smokes they might have sworn off earlier that evening.

A person without clinical depression is better equipped to ride things out.

Yet a bit more exercise has been shown to reduce the compulsion to reach for a cigarette — even if it is not enough to alleviate the symptoms of the depression itself.

Based on an 18-month study, quitting was found to be easier in the midst of even the most basic workouts, since withdrawal symptoms were reduced in the aftermath of regular walks.

“The review should be seen as a call to arms,” says study co-author Grégory Moullec, a postdoctoral researcher affiliated with Concordia’s Department of Exercise Science.

“Our hope is that this study will continue to sensitize researchers and clinicians on the promising role of exercise in the treatment of both depression and smoking cessation,” adds first author Paquito Bernard.

As well, for those who are having a hard time giving up cigarettes, the research sheds light on how that struggle can reveal depression that has not been adequately diagnosed.

Overall, investigations into how exercise can play a role in helping to quit smoking continues. Most people eager to break the habit would no doubt leap at the chance to shed their cravings through physical activity alone.

“We still need stronger evidence to convince policymakers,” explains Moullec.

“Unfortunately there is still skepticism about exercise compared to pharmacological strategies. But if we continue to conduct ambitious trials, using high-standard methodology, we will get to know which interventions are the most effective of all.”

Source: Concordia University

Depression Ups Smoking Cessation Challenge – Exercise Helpful

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Depression Ups Smoking Cessation Challenge – Exercise Helpful. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 23, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/07/23/depression-ups-smoking-cessation-challenge-exercise-helpful/72808.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.