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Overweight Teens Often Shunned by Peers

Overweight Teens Often Shunned by PeersYouth friendships appear to be influenced by visual appearance as researchers discover overweight young people are more likely to be rejected as friends by peers who are of normal weight.

However, overweight kids are mostly indifferent to the weight status of their friends.

In the new study, Arizona State University scientists used social network analysis to incorporate knowledge of how complex social and biological relations contribute to friendship behavior.

“We found consistent evidence that overweight youth choose non-overweight friends more often than they were selected in return,” said David R. Schaefer, Ph.D.

These results suggest that overweight youth often reach out to non-overweight peers for friendship, but are sometimes rebuffed in those efforts. As a consequence, overweight youth may turn to overweight peers for friendship.

Young people are also more likely to socially marginalize those who are overweight. As a consequence, overweight youth have one fewer friend, on average, than normal weight young people.

“This is especially troubling since friendships are important sources of support and companionship,” said co-author Sandra D. Simpkins, Ph.D.

“Not having or losing friends is associated with higher depression and lower self-worth for young people, which could exacerbate the health problems associated with being overweight.”

The influence of not having friends or being shunned because of extra weight can be especially difficult during formative teen years.

“Negative repercussions of not having friends may be more pronounced in middle and high school when intimacy and fitting into peer groups is critical,” Schaefer said.

Researchers analyzed data for the study from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health that surveyed 58,987 students in 88 middle and high schools. The average age of the multiracial survey sample was 15 and 51 percent were female.

Approximately 20 percent of students surveyed provided body mass index data. Students who participated in the study identified their 10 closest friends, five of whom were female and five who were male.

Researchers utilized social network analysis in the study in order to account for different types of friend selection processes, such as attraction based on similarities, meeting during extracurricular activities, or meeting through a mutual friend. This allowed the researchers to isolate the effect of weight status on friend selection.

“Long-term implications of the study include considering ramifications of social marginalization for prevention and intervention strategies that support the emotional development of overweight youth,” Simpkins said.

“It’s important to keep in mind that overweight youth still have lots of friends. Having just one friend makes a big difference. And, it’s less important how many friends teens have; what is key is that those friends are supportive.”

Source: Arizona State University
Lonely overweight teenager photo by shutterstock.

Overweight Teens Often Shunned by Peers

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Overweight Teens Often Shunned by Peers. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 22, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/05/16/overweight-teens-often-shunned-by-peers/69913.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.