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Speed-Reading Apps May Slow You Down

Speed-Reading Apps May Slow You Down The adage that there is an app for everything remains relevant even when the app itself may be counterproductive.

The latest example is an app designed for those on the go and pressed for time who would benefit from speed-reading software that eliminates the time we supposedly waste by moving our eyes as we read.

Unfortunately, new research suggests that the eye movements we make during reading actually play a critical role in our ability to understand what we’ve just read. So, don’t throw away your books, papers, and e-readers just yet.

The new study is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

“Our findings show that eye movements are a crucial part of the reading process,” says psychological scientist Elizabeth Schotter, Ph.D., of the University of California, San Diego, lead author of the new study.

“Our ability to control the timing and sequence of how we intake information about the text is important for comprehension.

“Our brains control how our eyes move through the text — ensuring that we get the right information at the right time.”

Studies have shown that readers make regressions, moving their eyes back to re-read bits of text, about 10 to 15 percent of the time; Schotter and colleagues tested the hypothesis that these regressions could be a fundamental component of reading comprehension.

The researchers recruited 40 college students to participate in the study. The students were instructed to read sentences (displayed on a computer screen) for comprehension.

Sometimes the sentences were presented normally; other times, the sentences were presented such that a word was masked with Xs as soon as the participants moved their eyes away from it, making it impossible for them to get more information from the word were they to return to it.

The results showed that, during normal reading, comprehension levels were about the same whether the students did or did not make a regression.

These results suggest that we only make regressions when we fail to understand something, and we can fill in the gap by going back to look again.

But, when the researchers compared data from the normal sentences and the masked sentences, they found that the students showed impaired comprehension for the masked sentences, presumably because they weren’t able to re-read when it would have been helpful.

“When readers cannot backtrack and get more information from words and phrases, their comprehension of the text is impaired,” said Schotter.

Importantly, the students showed similar impairments in comprehension for masked sentences that were straightforward and also for more difficult, ambiguous sentences, suggesting that regressions are critical for reading comprehension across the board.

The study has clear relevance to new apps that minimize eye movements and limit the amount of control readers have over the sequence of reading.

But, given how integral reading is to our everyday lives, the findings also have broad relevance to our understanding of how we read any piece of text.

Schotter and colleagues are currently planning follow-up experiments that apply a similar visual manipulation to different types of sentences, in order to further investigate the reading process.

Source: Association for Psychological Science

Speed-Reading Apps May Slow You Down

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Speed-Reading Apps May Slow You Down. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 24, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/04/24/speed-reading-apps-may-slow-you-down/68928.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.