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Which Gender Has Better Work Cooperation Skills?

Which Gender Has Better Work Cooperation Skills?A new study suggests a worker’s role, rank, and gender influences the way an individual cooperates with colleagues at work.

The Harvard study suggests the old stereotype of men as hugely competitive — meaning cooperative effort is the exception rather than the norm — while women have a tendency to nurture relationships with others, making them much more likely to cooperate with one another — is outdated.

Researchers found that within academic departments, women of different social or professional “ranks” cooperate with each other less well than men do, according to psychologists Drs. Joyce Benenson, an associate of Harvard’s Human Evolutionary Biology Department, and Henry Markovits, from the University of Quebec at Montreal.

However, with full professors of the same sex, the study found men and women cooperated equally well. The study is described in a paper published in Current Biology.

“The question we wanted to examine was: Do men or women cooperate better with members of their own sex?” said co-author Richard Wrangham, Ph.D.

“The conventional wisdom is that women cooperate more easily, but when you look at how armies or sports teams function, there is evidence that men are better at cooperating in some ways. Because there is so much conventional wisdom and general impressions on these issues, I think it’s helpful for this paper to focus on a very clear result, which has to do with the differences in cooperation when rank is involved.”

To get at whether and why those differences in cooperation might exist, Benenson and Wrangham set out to understand how often faculty at dozens of universities collaborate on academic papers.

They began by identifying 50 institutions from across the U.S. and Canada with at least two male and female full professors, and two male and female assistant professors in their psychology departments.

Researchers then set about identifying papers written by senior faculty from 2008 to 2012, and tracking how often senior faculty worked with other senior faculty, and how often they worked with junior faculty.

While the study focused on the world of higher education, Benenson explained that the notion of differences between how men and women cooperate was first planted during her work studying children.

“When I studied young children, I noticed that boys were typically interacting in groups, and girls tended to focus on one-on-one relationships,” said Benenson, the study’s lead author, who explored similar questions in her book “Warriors and Worriers.”

“There is even evidence that these differences exist in six-month-olds — but you can see it with the naked eye by about five or six years old, where boys form these large, loose groups, and girls tend to pair off into more intense, close friendships.”

“What makes those differences particularly provocative,” Benenson said, “is that chimpanzees organize their relationships in nearly identical ways. Chimpanzee males usually have another individual they’re very close with, and they may constantly battle for dominance, but they also have a larger, loose group of allies.

“When it comes to defeating other groups, everybody bands together. I would argue that females don’t have that biological inclination, and they don’t have the practice.”

That’s not to suggest women are inherently flawed when it comes to cooperation.

In fact, Benenson said, women are often thought of as being more egalitarian than men, “but there’s a flip side no one thinks about, which is what happens when they’re with someone who isn’t the same rank?”

Source: Harvard University

Which Gender Has Better Work Cooperation Skills?

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Which Gender Has Better Work Cooperation Skills?. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/03/04/which-gender-has-better-work-cooperation-skills/66653.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.