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Strongest Memories Are Often of Life Before Age 25

Strongest Memories Are Often of Life Before Age 25Researchers have discovered that when older adults were asked to tell their life stories, they overwhelmingly reminisced of times when important and often transitional milestones occurred.

Perhaps not surprisingly, most adults remember life events that happen in younger years such as first job, marriage, and having children.

“When people look back over their lives and recount their most important memories, most divide their life stories into chapters defined by important moments that are universal for many: a physical move, attending college, a first job, marriage, military experience, and having children,” said Kristina Steiner, a doctoral student in psychology at the University of New Hampshire (UNH).

Steiner and other members of the research team present the results of their study, “The reminiscence bump in older adults’ life story transitions,” in the journal Memory.

This review is the first to use a naturalistic approach by collecting free-flowing life stories. To do this, researchers spoke with 34 members of an active retirement community, ages 59 to 92.

All the participants were white, and 76 percent had earned at least an undergraduate degree.

Participants were asked to tell their life stories in 30 minutes. One week later, participants divided their life stories into self-defined “chapters.”

In the UNH study, researchers found a pronounced “reminiscence bump” between ages 17 and 24, when many people defined chapters of their life story beginning and ending.

A reminiscence bump is a period of time between the ages of 15 and 30 when many memories, positive and negative, expected and unexpected, are recalled.

“Many studies have consistently found that when adults are asked to think about their lives and report memories, remembered events occurring between the ages of 15 to 30 are over-represented.

“I wanted to know why this might be. Why don’t adults report more memories from the ages of 30 to 70? What is it about the ages of 15 to 30 that make them so much more memorable?” Steiner asked.

“Our life narratives are our identity. By looking at life narratives, researchers can predict levels of well-being and psychological adjustment in adults.

“Clinical therapists can use life narrative therapy to help people work through issues and problems in their lives by helping them see patterns and themes,” said Steiner, who studies autobiographical memory.

Source: University of New Hampshire

 
Collection of photographs photo by shutterstock.

Strongest Memories Are Often of Life Before Age 25

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Strongest Memories Are Often of Life Before Age 25. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/02/20/strongest-memories-are-often-of-life-before-age-25/66153.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.