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Talking to Children at Home Stimulates Brain Development

Talking to Children at Home Stimulates Brain DevelopmentChildren of lower-income, less-educated parents typically enter school with poorer language skills than their more privileged counterparts.

Educators report that by some measures, 5-year-old children of lower socioeconomic status (SES) score two years behind on standardized language development tests by the time they enter school.

This means that these children begin behind and often must struggle their entire school career in an effort to catch up to peers.

In recent years, Dr. Anne Fernald, a psychology professor at Stanford University, has conducted experiments revealing that the language gap between rich and poor children emerges during infancy.

Her work has shown that significant differences in both vocabulary and real-time language processing efficiency were already evident at age 18 months in English-learning infants from higher- and lower-SES families.

By age 24 months, there was a six-month gap between SES groups in processing skills critical to language development.

Fernald’s work has also identified one likely cause for this gap.

Using special technology to make all-day recordings of low-SES Spanish-learning children in their home environments, Fernald and her colleagues found striking variability in how much parents talked to their children.

Infants who heard more child-directed speech developed greater efficiency in language processing and learned new words more quickly.

The results indicate that exposure to child-directed speech — as opposed to overheard speech — sharpens infants’ language processing skills, with cascading benefits for vocabulary learning.

Fernald and colleagues are now running a parent-education intervention study with low-income Spanish-speaking mothers in East San Jose, California, funded by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation.

This new program, called ┬íHabla conmigo! (Talk with Me!), teaches Latina mothers how they can support their infants’ early brain development and helps them learn new strategies for engaging verbally with their children.

Although they only have data from 32 families so far, the preliminary results are promising. Mothers in the ¡Habla conmigo! program are communicating more and using higher quality language with their 18-month-olds compared to mothers in a control group.

“What’s most exciting,” said Fernald, “is that by 24 months the children of more engaged moms are developing bigger vocabularies and processing spoken language more efficiently.

“All parents need to be aware of the value of talking to their children during infancy, and that this effortless task can make a significant difference in a child’s life.”

Source: Stanford University

 
Mother talking with her child photo by shutterstock.

Talking to Children at Home Stimulates Brain Development

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Talking to Children at Home Stimulates Brain Development. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 15, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/02/14/talking-to-children-at-home-stimulates-brain-development/65878.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.