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Energy Drinks Associated with Use of Alcohol and Drugs

Energy Drinks Associated with Use of Alcohol and DrugsNew research discovers a strong link between teen consumption of high-caffeine energy drinks and use of alcohol, drugs, or cigarette smoking.

Investigators found that nearly one-third of US adolescents consume high-caffeine energy drinks or “shots.”

Researchers believe the same characteristics that attract young people to consume energy drinks — such as being “sensation-seeking or risk-oriented” — may make them more likely to use other substances as well.

Yvonne M. Terry-McElrath, M.S.A., and colleagues analyzed nationally representative data on nearly 22,000 US secondary school students (eighth, tenth, and twelfth graders).

The teens were participants in the University of Michigan’s “Monitoring the Future” study, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

As reported in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, researchers administered a survey and discovered about 30 percent of teens reported using caffeine-containing energy drinks or shots.

More than 40 percent said they drank regular soft drinks every day, while 20 percent drank diet soft drinks daily.

Boys were more likely to use energy drinks than girls. Use was also higher for teens without two parents at home and those whose parents were less educated.

Perhaps surprisingly, the youngest teens (eighth graders) were most likely to use energy drinks/shots.

Students who used energy drinks/shots were also more likely to report recent use of alcohol, cigarettes, and illicit drugs.

Across age groups and with adjustment for other factors, teens who used energy drinks/shots were two or three times more likely to report other types of substance use, compared to those who didn’t use energy drinks.

Soft drink consumption was also related to substance use. However, the associations were much stronger for energy drinks/shots.

Energy drinks and shots are products containing high doses of caffeine, marketed as aids to increasing energy, concentration, or alertness. Studies in young adults suggest that consumption of energy drinks is associated with increased use of alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco.

In young adults, energy drinks have been linked to behavioral patterns of “sensation-seeking or risk orientation.”

Energy drinks are often used together with alcohol, which may “mask” the intoxicating effects of alcohol.

The new study is one of the first to look at consumption of energy drinks by U.S adolescents, and how they may be related to other types of substance use.

“The current study indicates that adolescent consumption of energy drinks/shots is widespread and that energy drink users also report heightened risk for substance use,” Terry-McElrath and colleagues write.

They emphasize that their study provides no cause-and-effect data showing that energy drinks lead to substance abuse in teens.

However, the researchers believe that the findings linking energy drinks to substance use in young adults are likely relevant to adolescents as well.

They write, “[E]ducation for parents and prevention efforts among adolescents should include education on the masking effects of caffeine in energy drinks on alcohol- and other substance-related impairments, and recognition that some groups (such as high sensation–seeking youth) may be particularly likely to consume energy drinks and to be substance users.”

Even without the possible link to substance use, Terry-McElrath and coauthors note that, with their high caffeine and sugar content, energy drinks and shots aren’t a good dietary choice for teens.

They cite a recent American Academy of Pediatrics report stating that “[C]affeine and other stimulant substances contained in energy drinks have no place in the diet of children and adolescents.”

Source: Wolters Kluwer Health

Energy Drinks Associated with Use of Alcohol and Drugs

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Energy Drinks Associated with Use of Alcohol and Drugs. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2014/02/05/energy-drinks-associated-with-use-of-alcohol-and-drugs/65471.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.