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Poor Sleep Linked to Mood Disturbance in Obese

Poor Sleep Linked to Mood Disturbance in Obese New research discovers that poor sleep causes the extremely obese to have mood disturbances and a lower quality of life.

Investigators discovered that 74.8 percent of participants were poor sleepers, and their mean self-reported sleep duration was only six hours and 20 minutes.

Fifty-two percent of study subjects were anxious, and 43 percent were depressed.

After controlling for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, and obstructive sleep apnea, sleep quality and daytime sleepiness were significantly associated with mood disturbance and quality of life impairment.

“There was a clear association between the sleep problems such as short sleep duration and the psychological disorders and with quality of life,” said researcher G. Neil Thomas, Ph.D.

“These associations remained significant even after adjusting for a range of potential confounders.”

The study involved 270 patients with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 47.0 kg/m2 who were consecutively enrolled in a regional specialist weight management service. They had a mean age of 43 years. Sleep disturbance, daytime sleepiness, mood and quality of life were assessed using standardized questionnaires.

The study results appear in the journal Sleep.

“This study emphasizes the need for physicians to conduct routine screenings for sleep problems among people with severe obesity,” said American Academy of Sleep Medicine President M. Safwan Badr, M.D.

“Improving sleep quality and quantity will provide a physical, mental and emotional boost for people who are making the difficult lifestyle changes involved in managing obesity.”

According to the authors, the potential role of sleep in the health and well-being of individuals with severe obesity is underappreciated.

Although the cross-sectional design of the study did not allow for an examination of causality, the results suggest that the early detection of disturbed sleep could prevent the potential development and perpetuation of psychological problems among people with extreme obesity.

“Despite the very high levels of problems in these patients, those involved with their care usually don’t ask about sleep problems and often pay little heed to the psychological issues underlying the obesity,” said Thomas.

“The focus is often on treating the obesity and its consequences, such as diet and exercise interventions, rather than addressing its underlying cause, which may be psychological in nature, such as an unhappy marriage or job stress.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 35.7 percent of U.S. adults are obese with a BMI of 30 or higher. The CDC estimates that the annual medical cost of obesity in the U.S. was $147 billion in 2008 dollars.

Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Tired obese woman photo by shutterstock.

Poor Sleep Linked to Mood Disturbance in Obese

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Poor Sleep Linked to Mood Disturbance in Obese. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2013/12/06/poor-sleep-linked-to-mood-disturbance-in-obese/62924.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.