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Touch Can Help Those With Low Self-Esteem Face Mortality

Touch Can Help Those With Low Self-Esteem Face MortalityNew research suggests the power of touch may help people with low self-esteem confront their own mortality. Researchers also believe the benefits of touch may supplement traditional cognitive-based therapies in treating low self-esteem and related disorders, such as depression and anxiety.

“Even fleeting and seemingly trivial instances of interpersonal touch may help people to deal more effectively with existential concern,” said psychological scientist and lead researcher Sander Koole, Ph.D., of VU University Amsterdam.

“This is important because we all have to deal with existential concerns and we all have times at which we struggle to find meaning in life,” said Koole.

“Our findings show that people may still find existential security through interpersonal touch, even in the absence of symbolic meaning derived from religious beliefs or life values.”

In a series of studies published in Psychological Science, Koole and colleagues tested the hypothesis that people with low self-esteem deal with existential concerns by connecting with others.

In one study, an experimenter approached participants as they walked through a university campus. The experimenter handed the participants questionnaires to fill out; for some of the participants, she accompanied the questionnaire with a light, open-palmed touch on the participant’s shoulder blade that lasted about 1 second.

Interestingly, participants with low self-esteem who received the brief touch reported less death anxiety on the questionnaire than those who had not been touched.

Touch also seemed to act as a buffer against social alienation when participants were reminded of their mortality: Participants with low self-esteem showed no decreased in social connectedness after being reminded of death, but only if they had received a light touch.

The research suggests that individuals with low self-esteem may desire, and even seek out, touch when they are confronted with their mortality.

Participants with low self-esteem who were reminded of death estimated the value of a plush teddy bear at about €23 (about $31 USD), while those who had not been reminded of death estimated the value at about €13 euros or $21, a one-third reduction in value.

Being able to touch the teddy bear while estimating its value seemed to provide existential comfort to participants with low self-esteem, reducing their levels of ethnocentrism, a common defensive reaction to reminders of death.

“Our findings show that even touching an inanimate object — such as a teddy bear — can soothe existential fears,” notes Koole. “Interpersonal touch is such a powerful mechanism that even objects that simulate touch by another person may help to instill in people a sense of existential significance.”

While the existential benefits of touch may be limited by various factors — such as who or what is providing the touch — Koole and colleagues believe that touch could be a useful supplement to more traditional cognitive-based therapies in treating low self-esteem and related disorders, such as depression and anxiety.

The researchers are currently exploring the possibilities of simulated interpersonal touch through the use of a “haptic jacket,” which can electronically give people the feeling that they are being hugged.

Source: Association for Psychological Science

 

Man with hand on a woman’s shoulder photo by shutterstock.

Touch Can Help Those With Low Self-Esteem Face Mortality

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Touch Can Help Those With Low Self-Esteem Face Mortality. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2013/11/07/touch-can-help-those-with-low-self-esteem-face-mortality/61721.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.