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Most Parents Want to Email Doctors, But Not So Many Want to Pay

Most Parents Want to Email Doctors, But Not So Many Want to PayA new national survey finds that most parents want online options from kids’ health care providers, but half say it should be free, according to a new University of Michigan Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health.

In the poll, 77 percent of parents said they would be likely to seek email advice for their children’s minor illness if that service were available. Only 6 percent of parents said they could currently get that email advice from their child’s health care provider.

Parents in the poll reported a range of co-pays charged for office visits, from nothing to $30 per visit.

But about half of those polled felt any charge for an email consultation should be less than that of an office visit. And 48 percent of those polled felt an online consultation should be free.

The poll surveyed 1,420 parents with a child aged 0 to 17 years old.

“Most parents know it can be inconvenient to schedule and get to an office visit for a sick child. An email consultation would prevent the hassles of scheduling and allow sick children to remain at home. Email also could be available after hours when their caregiver’s office is closed, said Sarah J. Clark, M.P.H.

“But many health care providers don’t have co-pays established for this kind of consultation, so we decided to ask parents what they think.”

Clark says the results of this poll mirror concerns that health care providers have expressed about email consultation.

Providers argue that parents do not appreciate the unseen workload of email consultation, such as reviewing the child’s medical history, and documenting the email exchange within the child’s medical record, said Clark, associate director of the Child Health Evaluation and Research (CHEAR) Unit at the University of Michigan.

“Providers also worry about creating an expectation that they are on call to answer emails at all hours of the day. No one wants a child’s care delayed if an email can’t be answered right away,” Clark said.

There also are concerns about making sure online systems are implemented to ensure the privacy and security of email exchanges.

Some health care providers already offer email consultation along with a package of online/electronic services that can include family conferences, texting and Web chats. These often come with a monthly or annual fee, rather than a fee per transaction.

“But given the overwhelming desire from parents for an email option, we hope these poll results can get the discussion started on the best way to use technology to get better, more convenient care options for young patients but still provides a workable solution for both providers and parents,” Clark said.

Source: University of Michigan

 

Online healthcare photo by shutterstock.

Most Parents Want to Email Doctors, But Not So Many Want to Pay

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Most Parents Want to Email Doctors, But Not So Many Want to Pay. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 20, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2013/10/22/most-parents-want-to-email-doctors-but-not-so-many-want-to-pay/61024.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.