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Pairing Brain Imaging Tools to Probe Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

Brain Imaging Technology Illustrates Abnormalities in SchizophreniaIn a new paper in the journal Biological Psychiatry, Fei Du, Ph.D., and colleagues at Harvard Medical School combined two types of brain imaging to analyze abnormalities in the white matter in schizophrenia.

One type of imaging, called magnetic resonance spectroscopy, measures the levels of particular chemicals in the brain. Another, called magnetization transfer imaging, is sensitive to changes in the level of myelin in the white matter.

White matter is primarily composed of myelin, a tissue that covers nerve cell projections (axons) insulating the cell and aiding effective transmittal of neural impulses.

“The notion that the brain in schizophrenia is characterized by abnormalities in connections between distant brain regions is not new, and imaging studies using diffusion tensor imaging have long suggested that the white matter where these connections travel is abnormal in this condition,” said senior author  Dost Öngür, M.D., Ph.D.

“However, we have not had the tools to determine whether the abnormalities are in axons, or the myelin sheath around the axons, or both.”

The researchers found evidence for abnormalities in both myelin and axons among patients with schizophrenia, when compared with healthy individuals who underwent the same testing.

More specifically, they found reduced myelination of white matter pathways in schizophrenia, and also abnormal diffusion of N-acetylaspartate, a metabolite thought to be predominately localized within nerve cells.

This pattern of results is indicative of abnormalities in information processing and cognitive deficits, which is consistent with what scientists already know about how the brain is impacted by schizophrenia and the symptoms associated with this disorder.

“This study provides new evidence that myelination abnormalities in schizophrenia are associated with disturbances in the functional integrity of the white matter.

“As the white matter carries long-range communication in the brain, the current findings raise new questions about the functional impact and treatment for these neural deficits,” said Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.

These findings are important because they suggest that “the white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia are complex and interconnected,” said Öngür. “A strategy to impact both axonal health and myelin synthesis may be needed to restore normal white matter functioning in this condition.”

Such a strategy to restore abnormal functioning is not likely in the near future, but advances provided by this study and others like it help bring scientists ever closer to that ultimate goal.

Source: Elsevier

Pairing Brain Imaging Tools to Probe Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Pairing Brain Imaging Tools to Probe Abnormalities in Schizophrenia. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 22, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2013/09/17/pairing-brain-imaging-tools-to-probe-abnormalities-in-schizophrenia/59614.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.