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Physiological Arousal May Help or Hinder Negotiations

Physiological Arousal May Help or Hinder NegotiationsPeople have long been warned to control their emotions during negotiations — that sort of arousal, it was thought, would cloud an individual’s decision-making.

Now, new research suggests that sweaty palms and a racing heart may actually help some people in getting a good deal.

The new study by MIT researchers Ashley D. Brown and Jared R. Curhan, Ph.D., is published in the journal Psychological Science.

In the study, researchers used two experiments to demonstrate that physiological arousal isn’t always detrimental.

“It turns out that the effect depends on whether you are someone who dreads or looks forward to negotiating,” Brown explains. “It’s not inherently harmful.”

In their first experiment, Brown and Curhan assessed participants’ attitudes toward negotiation.

Several weeks later, they had participants walk on a treadmill while negotiating over the price of a used car. Some participants walked quickly to increase their heart rates, while others walked at a slower pace.

Among the participants with negative attitudes toward negotiation, those who had increased heart rate expressed being less satisfied with their negotiations in comparison to the slow-walking participants.

Those who initially reported positive attitudes, on the other hand, were more likely to express greater satisfaction with the negotiation after walking at a faster pace.

Results from a second experiment in which participants negotiated an employment compensation package suggest that physiological arousal may even enhance the negotiating abilities of those with positive attitudes toward negotiation.

Brown and Curhan found that participants who look forward to negotiating and who walked while doing so achieved higher economic outcomes than those who sat during the negotiation session.

In contrast, participants who dreaded negotiating and who walked during the negotiation performed worse.

Ultimately, the new research suggests that the effects of physiological arousal are driven by subjective interpretation.

People who can’t stand negotiating seem to interpret arousal as a negative sign of nervousness, and physiological arousal therefore has a detrimental effect on their performance. But those who relish a chance to negotiate seem to interpret arousal as a positive sign of excitement, making them feel “revved up,” and the arousal boosts their performance.

Given these findings, Brown and Curhan wonder whether the conventional advice to “just relax” might be outmoded. And they note that the benefits of physiological arousal may not be limited to negotiation:

“We speculate that this polarizing effect of physiological arousal is more widely applicable to other contexts such as public speaking, competitive sports, or test performance, to name a few,” said Brown.

Source: Association for Psychological Science

Physiological Arousal May Help or Hinder Negotiations

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Physiological Arousal May Help or Hinder Negotiations. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 26, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2013/08/27/physiological-arousal-may-help-or-hinder-negotiations/58938.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.