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Anxiety, Alcohol Linked with College Students’ Emotional Ties to Facebook

Anxiety, Alcohol Linked with College Students' Emotional Ties to FacebookThe dramatic success of Facebook has led researchers to study how emotionally involved Facebook users become with the social networking site and if certain common social precursors lead to Facebook connections with other people.

Clearly, Facebook offers something to its nearly one billion users worldwide, many of who monitor or post to Facebook as a daily activity.

In the new study, Russell Clayton, now a doctoral student at the University of Missouri School of Journalism, found that anxiety and alcohol use significantly predicted emotional connectedness to Facebook.

Clayton’s master’s thesis surveyed more than 225 college freshmen students concerning their perceived levels of loneliness, anxiousness, alcohol use and marijuana use in the prediction of emotional connectedness to Facebook and Facebook connections.

He discovered that students who reported higher levels of anxiousness and alcohol use appeared to be more emotionally connected with the social networking site. Clayton and his colleagues also found that students who reported higher levels of loneliness and anxiousness use Facebook as a platform to connect with others.

“People who perceive themselves to be anxious are more likely to want to meet and connect with people online, as opposed to a more social, public setting,” Clayton said.

“Also, when people who are emotionally connected to Facebook view pictures and statuses of their Facebook friends using alcohol, they are more motivated to engage in similar online behaviors in order to fit in socially.”

Clayton said that because alcohol use is generally viewed as normative, or socially acceptable, among college students, increased alcohol use may cause an increase in emotional connectedness to Facebook. The researchers also found that marijuana use predicted the opposite: a lack of emotional connectedness with Facebook.

“Marijuana use is less normative, meaning fewer people post on Facebook about using it,” Clayton said. “In turn, people who engage in marijuana use are less likely to be emotionally attached to Facebook.”

Clayton and his fellow researchers also found that students who reported high levels of perceived loneliness were not emotionally connected to Facebook, but use Facebook as a tool to connect with others.

This study was published in the Journal of Computers in Human Behavior.

Source: University of Missouri

Young woman drinking while on computer photo by shutterstock.

Anxiety, Alcohol Linked with College Students’ Emotional Ties to Facebook

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Anxiety, Alcohol Linked with College Students’ Emotional Ties to Facebook. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 23, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2013/04/11/anxiety-alcohol-linked-with-college-students-emotional-ties-to-facebook/53686.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.