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Small Samples Used for Online Physician Ratings

Small Samples Used for Online Physician Ratings Although millions of Americans go to the web to learn how physicians are rated, a new study finds that physician ratings on websites are based on scores from an average of only 2.4 patients.

As such, investigators warn individuals on placing too much value on web rankings for physician information.

In the study, researchers from the Loyola University Medical Center reviewed 500 selected urologists.

Investigators found that nearly 80 percent of physicians were rated by at least one of 10 free physician-review websites.

Eighty-six percent of physicians had positive ratings, with 36 percent receiving highly positive ratings. Healthgrades had the most physician ratings.

Results were published online ahead of print in the Journal of Urology.

“Consumers should be cautious when they look at these ratings,” said first author Chandy Ellimoottil, M.D. “Our findings suggest that consumers should take these ratings with a grain of salt.”

Ellimoottil explained that because physicians typically receive so few ratings, a highly negative or highly positive score from just one or two patients could skew the physician’s rating.

“These sites have potential to help inform consumers,” Ellimoottil said. “But the sites need more reviews to make them more reliable.”

Half of Americans who go online for health information look up their providers and 40 percent use physician-review websites. But there have been few studies about such websites.

Ellimoottil, senior author Ahmer Farooq, D.O., and colleagues randomly selected 500 of the nation’s 9,940 urologists for inclusion in the study, including 471 male and 29 female urologists from 39 states.

On each website, the number of reviews per physician ranged from zero to 64, with the average being 2.4.

Researchers found no statistically significant difference in the median number of reviews when gender, region and city size were compared.

Healthgrades posted reviews on 54 percent of physicians, followed in order by Vitals.com, 45 percent of physicians; Avvo.com, 39 percent; RateMDs.com, 25 percent; Drscore, 13 percent; Revolutionhealth.com, 5 percent; Kudzu.com and Healthcarereviews.com, 1 percent; and Zocdoc.com and Yelp.com, less than 1 percent.

Researchers also conducted a qualitative analysis of written comments posted on a single website, Vitals.com. Comments were rated extremely negative (such as “He needs to retire as he can barely walk”); negative; neutral; positive; or extremely positive (such as “One of the best checkups in a long time!!”).

Three percent of these written comments were extremely negative, 22 percent were negative, 22 percent were neutral, 39 percent were positive and 14 percent were extremely positive.

Source: Loyola University Health System

Doctor holding a computer photo by shutterstock.

Small Samples Used for Online Physician Ratings

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Small Samples Used for Online Physician Ratings. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2013/01/03/small-samples-used-for-online-physician-ratings/49964.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.