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Media Multitasking Tied to Anxiety, Depression

Media Multitasking Tied to Anxiety, DepressionUsing multiple forms of media at the same time — such as playing a computer game while watching TV — is linked to symptoms of anxiety and depression in a new study out of Michigan State University.

Psychologist Dr. Mark Becker, lead investigator on the study, said he was surprised to find such a clear association between media multitasking and mental health problems.

Still, although a relationship or an association has been found, researchers admit that a cause-and-effect scenario has not been established; there is no evidence that media multitasking “causes” anxiety and depression.

“We don’t know whether the media multitasking is causing symptoms of depression and social anxiety, or if it’s that people who are depressed and anxious are turning to media multitasking as a form of distraction from their problems,” said Becker.

While overall media use among American youth has increased 20 percent in the past decade, the amount of time spent multitasking with media spiked 120 percent during that period, Becker said.

In the study, which appears in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, Becker and colleagues surveyed 319 people on their media use and mental health.

Participants were asked how many hours per week they used two or more of the primary forms of media, which include television, music, cell phones, text messaging, computer and video games, web surfing and others.

For the mental health survey, the researchers used well-established measures, although the results do not reflect a clinical diagnosis.

Becker said future research should explore cause and effect. If it turns out media multitasking is causing depression and anxiety, recommendations could be made to alleviate the problem, he said.

On the other hand, if depressed or anxious people are turning to media multitasking, that might actually help them deal with their problems. It could also serve as a warning sign that a youngster is becoming depressed or anxious.

“Whatever the case, it’s very important information to have,” Becker said. “This could have important implications for understanding how to minimize the negative impacts of increased media multitasking.”

Source: Michigan State University

Woman watching television while using her laptop photo by shutterstock.

Media Multitasking Tied to Anxiety, Depression

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Media Multitasking Tied to Anxiety, Depression. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/12/05/media-multitasking-tied-to-anxiety-depression/48622.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.