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Personal Beliefs Affect Medication Compliance

Personal Beliefs Affect Medication Compliance  Experts say that nearly half of patients taking medications for chronic conditions do not follow their prescribed medication regimens.

New research suggests the poor compliance is associated with an individual’s belief about the necessity of the medications as well as concerns about long-term effects and dependency.

For most medications, failure to use the drugs as prescribed can increase a person’s risk for side effects and elevate the chance of hospitalizations. Often quality of life is compromised and risk of mortality increased.

In a new study, researchers discover that patients’ poor adherence to prescribed medication regimens is connected to their beliefs about the necessity of prescriptions and concerns about long-term effects and dependency.

Todd Ruppar, a University of Missouri assistant professor, found that patients’ beliefs about the causes of high blood pressure and the effectiveness of treatment alternatives significantly affected their likelihood of faithfully following prescribed medication regimens.

In his pilot study, Ruppar focused on older patients’ adherence to medication treatments that control high blood pressure, a condition that affects nearly 70 million adults in the U.S. and can lead to heart disease and stroke.

“Often, patients with chronic diseases are prescribed medications but they already have underlying beliefs about the causes of high blood pressure and how it can be treated, which leads them to underuse their medications,” Ruppar said.

“For example, some individuals might be able to reduce their blood pressure by walking or cutting down on salt consumption; however, most people need medication to reduce their risk of adverse health outcomes.”

Rather than relying on education approaches, Ruppar says practitioners should aim to amend patients’ behaviors using tactics such as electronic pill bottle caps that alert patients to take medications at specific times or more frequent monitoring of their blood pressure levels so they associate medication adherence with health benefits and non-adherence with negative side effects.

“Patients benefit from objective feedback to see what led them to miss doses, such as varying sleep patterns or weekend schedules. Then, they can change their routines to make taking doses as habitual as brushing their teeth,” Ruppar said.

“Self-management is important because encounters with health care providers are fairly short, so as patients, we tend to have better outcomes if we work with our providers to manage our chronic conditions.”

The study was published in Geriatric Nursing.

Source: University of Missouri

Personal Beliefs Affect Medication Compliance

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Personal Beliefs Affect Medication Compliance. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 20, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/10/16/personal-beliefs-affect-medication-compliance/46124.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.