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Multitasking Seems to Serve Emotional, Not Productivity, Needs

Multitasking Seems to Serve Emotional, Not Productivity, NeedsThe pace of everyday life and the ubiquity of media make multitasking a common part of daily existence for many. And while new research suggests multitasking can be stimulating and fun, it is actually not productive and hinders cognitive performance.

“There’s this myth among some people that multitasking makes them more productive,” said Zheng Wang, Ph.D., lead author of the study and assistant professor of communication at Ohio State University.

“But they seem to be misperceiving the positive feelings they get from multitasking. They are not being more productive — they just feel more emotionally satisfied from their work.”

Take, for example, students who watched TV while reading a book. They reported feeling more emotionally satisfied than those who studied without watching TV, but also reported that they didn’t achieve their cognitive goals as well, Wang said.

“They felt satisfied not because they were effective at studying, but because the addition of TV made the studying entertaining. The combination of the activities accounts for the good feelings obtained,” Wang said.

Wang’s study warns that multitasking can become a chronic, nonproductive behavior for college students.

In the study, researchers had college students record all of their media use and other activities for 28 days, including why they used various media sources and what they got out of it.

Investigators discovered multitasking often gave students an emotional boost, even when it hurt their cognitive functions — such as studying.

Wang said many studies done in laboratory settings have found that people show poorer performance on a variety of tasks when they try to juggle multiple media sources at the same time: for example, going from texting a friend, to reading a book, to watching an online video.

But surveys show that media multitasking is only becoming more popular. The question, Wang said, is why do people do so much multitasking if it actually impairs their performance?

To answer that question, Wang said they had to move out of the laboratory and into real life. They recruited 32 college students who agreed to carry a cellphone-like device and report on their activities three times each day for four weeks.

The participants reported on each media use (such as computer, radio, print, television, radio) and sub-types (for computer use, whether they were web browsing, using social networking, etc.). They reported the type of activity, the duration, and whether any other activities were performed simultaneously (in other words, whether they were multitasking).

They also provided their motivations for each activity or combination of activities from a list of seven potential needs, including social, fun/entertainment, study/work, and habits/background noise. For each need, they reported the strength of the need on a 10-point scale, and whether those needs were met on a 4-point scale.

From the results, researchers determined students often multitask because of unmet cognitive needs – such as study or work – or out of habit.

Ironically, students turn to multitasking when they perceive a need to study (a cognitive need), yet this multitasking didn’t do a very good job of satisfying their cognitive needs. Wang believes this is probably because their other media use distracted them from the job of studying.

However, the students reported that the multitasking was very good at meeting their emotional needs (fun/entertainment/relaxing) — interestingly, a need they weren’t even seeking to fulfill.

In addition, the results showed that habits played an important role in the use of media multitasking.

“Our findings showed that habitual needs increase media multitasking and are also gratified from multitasking,” she said. This suggests that people get used to multitasking, which makes them more likely to continue.

“We found what we call a dynamical feedback loop. If you multitask today, you’re likely to do so again tomorrow, further strengthening the behavior over time,” she said.

“This is worrisome because students begin to feel like they need to have the TV on or they need to continually check their text messages or computer while they do their homework. It’s not helping them, but they get an emotional reward that keeps them doing it.

“It is critical that we carefully examine the long-term influence of media multitasking on how we perform on cognitive tasks.”

Results from the study appear online in the Journal of Communication.

Source: Ohio State University

Teenager watching tv and working on computer photo by shutterstock.

Multitasking Seems to Serve Emotional, Not Productivity, Needs

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Multitasking Seems to Serve Emotional, Not Productivity, Needs. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/05/01/multitasking-seems-to-serve-emotional-not-productivity-needs/38057.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.