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Brain Can Instantly Skew Perception

Scientists have long known that thoughts affect our senses. For example, poorer children think coins are larger than they are, and hungry people think pictures of food are brighter.

In a new study, investigators found that hungry people see food-related words more clearly than people who’ve just eaten. But this shift occurs during early perceptual stages, before higher parts of the brain have a chance to spin the sensory input from the eyes.

Rémi Radel, Ph.D., of University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, France, wanted to investigate how this happens — whether it’s right away, as the brain receives signals from the eyes, or a little later, as the brain’s higher-level thinking processes get involved.

Radel recruited 42 students with a normal body mass index. On the day of his or her test, each student was told to arrive at the lab at noon after three or four hours of not eating. Then they were told there was a delay. Some were told to come back in 10 minutes; others were given an hour to get lunch first. So half the students were hungry when they did the experiment and the other half had just eaten.

During the experiment, participants looked at a computer screen. One by one, 80 words flashed on the screen for about 1/300th of a second each, at a size that was just at the threshold of what that person could consciously perceive.

A quarter of the words were food-related. After each word, the person was asked how bright the word was and asked to choose which of two words they’d seen — a food-related word like gateau (cake) or a neutral word like bateau (boat). Each word appeared too briefly for the participant to really read it.

Hungry people saw the food-related words as brighter and were better at identifying food-related words. Because the word appeared too quickly for them to be reliably seen, this indicates that the difference is perceptual.

According to Radel, this shows that the result is immediate, not because of some kind of processing happening in the brain after you’ve already figured out what you’re looking at.

“This is something great to me, that humans can really perceive what they need or what they strive for, to know that our brain can really be at the disposal of our motives and needs,” Radel said.

“There is something inside us that selects information in the world to make life easier.”

The study is published in Psychological Science.

Source: Association for Psychological Science

Brain Can Instantly Skew Perception

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Brain Can Instantly Skew Perception. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/03/05/brain-can-instantly-skew-perception/35597.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.