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Workplace Culture Can Reduce Injuries On the Job

Workplace Culture Can Reduce Injuries On the Job Some six thousand Americans are killed at work each year, and a University of Georgia study suggests the culture of the workplace can be a critical factor in reducing or increasing risk of injury.

Researchers determined a worker’s perception of safety and the work-life balance established by businesses has a significant effect on work-related injuries.

“We’ve known for some time that certain occupations are more dangerous than others due to a variety of physical and other hazards,” said study author Dave DeJoy, Ph.D. “But in the last 20 years, there has been growing evidence that management and organizational factors also play a critical role. That is, actions taken or not taken at the organizational level can either set the stage for injuries or help prevent them.”

DeJoy and his colleagues examined U.S. safety climate perceptions among a diverse sample of occupations and worker groups — from offices to factories — and to highlight the factors linked to injury.

The results were published online in January and will be in the March issue of the Journal of Safety Research.

Investigators discovered that well-managed companies can decrease injuries by 38 percent as worker opinions improve.

A worker’s perception of a positive safety climate can decrease injuries by 32 percent. In the survey, questions pertaining to the safety climate assessed worker perceptions on the importance of their safety in their work organization.

“We can design the best safety controls, but they must be maintained, and that falls on management,” Smith said.

Researcher found that the work culture including policies and procedures that applied to day-to-day operations were factors that define a safe environment.

“Enacted policies and procedures-not formalized ones but those acted upon-define a climate of safety.”

DeJoy agrees. “Injury is a failure of management. Organizations who blame individuals for injuries do not create a positive safety climate.”

In addition to factors identified by the study to decrease injuries, work-family interference was established as a significant risk for occupational injury.

“We used to think work was one thing and family was another, but now there is a realization that work-life balance affects performance and productivity,” DeJoy said.

The study looked at the mutual interference between job and family demands. In situations where work interferes with family life or family demands affect job performance, they found that the risk for injury increased 37 percent.

Consistent with previous studies performed by the Department of Labor Statistics, they found whites had higher injury rates than blacks, but both had lower rates than the “other” category, which is predominately made up of Hispanics.

“These results provide guidance for targeting interventions and protective measures to curtail occupational injury in the U.S.,” said co-author Todd Smith, a recent graduate of the Health Promotion and Behavior doctoral program at UGA..

DeJoy was part of a team of researchers that worked with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to put together a quality of work life survey module that featured a number of scales and measures assessing different job and organizational factors.

This module was included as part of the General Social Survey and administered to a national representative sample of American adults.

In the current study, DeJoy and his team assessed occupational injury risk in terms of socio-demographic factors, employment characteristics and organizational factors for 1,525 respondents using data from the quality of work life module.

The study identified race, occupational category and work-family interferences as risk factors for occupational injury and safety climate and organizational effectiveness as protective factors.

“The data suggests effects are pronounced and generalized across all occupations,” said Smith, who spent 12 years as a workplace safety consultant before starting his graduate program at UGA.

“Most prior research on organizational factors has focused on single occupations or single organizations,” DeJoy said. “There has been a clear need to examine these factors across a diverse array of occupations and employment circumstances to see how generalizable or pervasive these factors are.”

The nine factors they examined were participation, work-family interference, management-employee relations, organizational effectiveness, safety climate, job content, advancement potential, resource adequacy and supervisor support.

Source: University of Georgia – Athens

Workplace Culture Can Reduce Injuries On the Job

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Workplace Culture Can Reduce Injuries On the Job. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/02/21/workplace-culture-can-reduce-injuries-on-the-job/35083.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
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