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Severe Memory Loss Tied to Future Stroke

Severe Memory Loss Tied to Future Stroke A new paper warns that severe, rapid memory loss may be linked to a future deadly stroke, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2012.

Researchers believe knowledge of the association could pave the way for aggressive therapies to minimize risk for stroke.

In the study, researchers found that people who died after stroke had more severe memory loss in the years before stroke compared to people who survived stroke or people who didn’t have a stroke.

“We’re most surprised that people who died after strokes had such sharp memory declines years before stroke onset,” said Qianyi Wang, the study’s lead author and a graduate student at the Harvard University School of Public Health in Boston, Mass.

Researchers examined 11,814 people age 50 years and older every two years for signs of declining memory. Study participants were stroke-free at enrollment and were followed up to 10 years.

A unique feature of this study is that participants continued in the study after surviving a stroke. Over the 10-year period, investigators documented 1,820 strokes, including 364 individuals who died after stroke but before the next memory assessment.

Average memory loss each year was compared for participants who remained stroke free. Memory loss was also assessed among participants who survived a stroke — considering their memory loss might be different before and after stroke.

The researchers used a standard word-recall list to measure memory loss. For participants whose memory loss became too severe to use the word lists, researchers interviewed spouses or other caregivers using a standardized assessment.

The average memory score each year dropped:

  • 0.078 points in those who didn’t have a stroke while in the study;
  • 0.137 points before stroke in those who later survived a stroke;
  • 0.205 points before stroke in those who later died from stroke.

Researchers discovered the people who survived a stroke had worse average memory even before the stroke compared to similar individuals who never had a stroke during follow-up.

At the time of stroke, memory function dropped an average 0.321 points. This difference is about the same as the average memory decline associated with growing 4.1 years older among those who remained stroke-free.

Because of the large stroke-related declines, memory impairment was common among stroke survivors.

Researchers believe several factors may explain the presentation of increased memory loss before a fatal stroke.

“People who die after stroke may have worse underlying disease prior to stroke. This suggests early disease is accumulating and that something is happening to these people before they are diagnosed with clinical stroke.” said M. Maria Glymour, S.D., senior study author and an assistant professor at the Harvard School of Public Health.

“However, memory impairment is associated with increased mortality regardless of stroke. Memory impairment may therefore make patients more vulnerable to death in the wake of the stroke, for reasons that are unrelated to stroke severity. We’re not sure which is true and we can’t tell with these analyses, but we hope to examine this in the future.”

Studies are needed to determine whether the effects of stroke on memory differ for different groups of people; for example, these effects may vary depending on race, gender, geographic location and socioeconomic status.

“Even health conditions that are much more common at older ages may have roots earlier in life,” Glymour said. “Your entire life course influences your health in old age.”

Source: American Heart Association

Elderly woman photo by shutterstock.

Severe Memory Loss Tied to Future Stroke

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Severe Memory Loss Tied to Future Stroke. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/02/02/severe-memory-loss-tied-to-future-stroke/34383.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.