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Family Leave Benefits Households, Businesses, Taxpayers

Family Leave Helps Households, Improves Economy  A new study concludes that providing paid family leave to workers leads to positive economic outcomes for working families, businesses and the public.

Investigators from the Center for Women and Work at Rutgers found that women who use paid leave are far more likely to be working nine to 12 months after a child’s birth than those who do not take any leave. These women also report increases in wages from pre- to post-birth.

“While we have known for a long time about the maternal and infant health benefits of leave policies, we can now link paid family leave to greater labor force attachment and increased wages for women, as well as to reduced spending by businesses in the form of employee replacement costs, and by governments in the form of public assistance,” said author Linda Houser, Ph.D.

Researchers discovered women who take paid leave are 39 percent less likely to receive public assistance and 40 percent less likely to receive food stamps in the year following a child’s birth, when compared to those who do not take any leave.

Not only is paid leave associated with fewer dollars in public assistance spending, it reduces the chance that a family receiving public assistance will increase its use of public funding following a child’s birth, Houser said.

“At a time when governments are struggling with deficits and working families are struggling to stay afloat, this new study shows that allowing workers to take paid time off to recover from illness or care for their families saves precious government and taxpayer resources, while giving families the stability they urgently need,” said Debra L. Ness, president of the National Partnership for Women & Families.

“There couldn’t be a better time for employers and legislators to prioritize these policies.”

Researchers analyzed data collected from 1997 to 2009 by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics’ and discovered a 13 percent increase (to 72.3 percent) in the percentage of children with both parents (in married-couple families) or their only parent working.

“Despite public conversation and energy around the value of strong families and secure childhoods, the United States has fallen notably behind other industrialized countries in adopting public policies that support workers who need time off to address family needs,” the researchers write.

Investigators also noted that except for a handful of states, public policy in the U.S. has been limited to unpaid leave.

Since 1993, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) has required that eligible employees who work for employers with a minimum of 50 workers be provided up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave annually “for their own health or the health of a family member.”

The absence of federal-level policy pertaining to paid family leave often forces workers to “cobble together” such employer-provided leave as sick days, holidays, vacation time, disability insurance and/or paid or unpaid leave to deal with personal or family health problems. Many low-income workers have no vacation, sick or other leave.

“A handful of states (California, Hawaii, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island) have taken the lead in providing some form of paid leave to workers, but it’s long past time for a national policy,” said Vicki Shabo, director of work and family programs at the National Partnership.

“Establishing a nationwide standard would allow workers to meet their families’ needs without sacrificing their economic security or having to rely on a patchwork of policies. The study demonstrates conclusively that doing so also would benefit businesses and our economy.”

The researchers conclude that changing workforce demographics, the work-family needs of a new generation of workers, and national and international trends toward workplace flexibility would create “a powerful case for a careful examination of the United States’ family leave policies.”

Source: Rutgers University

Family Leave Benefits Households, Businesses, Taxpayers

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Family Leave Benefits Households, Businesses, Taxpayers. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/01/23/family-leave-helps-households-improves-economy/33982.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.